In children with cow’s milk allergy, 1-kestose affects the gut microbiota and reaction threshold

Rumiko Shibata, Yasuhiro Koga, Mayuko Takahashi, Youko Murakami, Takumi Tochio, Yoshihiro Kadota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Interventions targeting the gut microbiota for treating food allergy (FA) have been gaining much attention. Although several studies have examined the effects of probiotics, few have verified the effects of prebiotic intervention on FA in humans. Methods: We conducted a preliminary open-label, parallel-group comparison trial in children diagnosed with severe cow’s milk allergy (CMA) who were instructed to ingest baked milk (BM; bread or cookies) daily. The subjects either received or did not receive the prebiotic 1-kestose (kestose) daily for 6 months. CMA symptoms and the threshold dose for milk protein were evaluated by oral food challenge with heated milk or BM. Blood and fecal samples were also collected for investigations of the antigen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E levels and microbiota composition. Results: Kestose treatment significantly increased the threshold dose for milk protein, and decreased the milk- and casein-specific IgE levels in serum. In those treated with kestose, the abundance of Fusicatenibacter spp. significantly increased in the feces, and a significant inverse correlation was seen between the abundance of Fusicatenibacter spp. and the milk- and casein-specific IgE levels. Conclusion: Kestose treatment induced some tolerance to milk protein via changes in the gut microbiota composition in children with FA. Impact: A 6-month treatment with the prebiotic kestose increased the threshold dose for milk protein, and decreased the serum levels of milk- and casein-specific IgE in children diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy.The kestose treatment increased the abundance of Fusicatenibacter spp. in the gut, which was inversely correlated with the antigen-specific IgE levels.This is the first study to demonstrate that a prebiotic intervention induced some tolerance to an allergen in children with food allergy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1067-1074
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Research
Volume94
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 09-2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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