Individualized beta-band oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation over the primary motor cortex enhances corticomuscular coherence and corticospinal excitability in healthy individuals

Daisuke Kudo, Tadaki Koseki, Natsuki Katagiri, Kaito Yoshida, Keita Takano, Masafumi Jin, Mitsuhiro Nito, Shigeo Tanabe, Tomofumi Yamaguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Simultaneously modulating individual neural oscillation and cortical excitability may be important for enhancing communication between the primary motor cortex and spinal motor neurons, which plays a key role in motor control. However, it is unknown whether individualized beta-band oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation (otDCS) enhances corticospinal oscillation and excitability. Objective: This study investigated the effects of individualized beta-band otDCS on corticomuscular coherence (CMC) and corticospinal excitability in healthy individuals. Methods: In total, 29 healthy volunteers participated in separate experiments. They received the following stimuli for 10 min on different days: 1) 2-mA otDCS with individualized beta-band frequencies, 2) 2-mA transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) with individualized beta-band frequencies, and 3) 2-mA transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). The changes in CMC between the vertex and tibialis anterior (TA) muscle and TA muscle motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were assessed before and after (immediately, 10 min, and 20 min after) stimulation on different days. Additionally, 20-Hz otDCS for 10 min was applied to investigate the effects of a fixed beta-band frequency on CMC. Results: otDCS significantly increased CMC and MEPs immediately after stimulation, whereas tACS and tDCS had no effects. There was a significant negative correlation between normalized CMC changes in response to 20-Hz otDCS and the numerical difference between the 20-Hz and individualized CMC peak frequency before the stimulation. Conclusions: These findings suggest that simultaneous modulation of neural oscillation and cortical excitability is critical for enhancing corticospinal communication. Individualized otDCS holds potential as a useful method in the field of neurorehabilitation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-52
Number of pages7
JournalBrain Stimulation
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biophysics
  • Clinical Neurology

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