Influence of increased amount of exercise on improvements in walking ability of convalescent patients with post-stroke hemiplegia

Kenji Kawakami, Genichi Tanino, Ken Tomida, Yohei Kato, Makoto Watanabe, Yuko Okuyama, Shigeru Sonoda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

[Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of increased amount of physical therapy exercise on improvements in the walking ability of patients with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were selected from patients with stroke who were hospitalized in the convalescent rehabilitation ward, and included 91 patients who received physical therapy for 2.5–3 exercise sessions per day during 2005–2006 (PT3unit group), and 86 patients who received physical therapy for 4.5–6 exercise sessions per day during 2010–2015 (PT6unit group). The functional independence measure (FIM. score evaluates the walking ability of patients during hospital admission, 2 and 4 weeks after admission, and at discharge. The FIM score was stratified according to the degree of lower limb motor paralysis and subsequently compared between groups. [Results] Among the patients with complete paralysis and severe paralysis, the FIM-Walking scores at 4 weeks after admission and at discharge were significantly higher in the PT6unit group than in the PT3unit group. No significant differences were found between the PT6unit and PT3unit groups for patients with mild and moderate paralysis. [Conclusion] Higher amounts of physical therapy exercise contributed to improvements in the walking ability of patients with complete and severe lower limb paralysis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)602-606
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Physical Therapy Science
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 02-2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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