Influence of preadmission frailty on short- And mid-term prognoses in octogenarians with ST-elevation myocardial infarction

on behalf of the N-Registry Investigators

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Octogenarians, who are frequently frail, represent a large proportion of patients admitted for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We investigated the relationship between frailty, assessed by the Canadian Study of Health and Aging Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS), and short- and mid-term prognoses in octogenarian STEMI patients. Methods and Results: We used a multicenter registry data of 1,301 patients with STEMI undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) between January 2014 and December 2016. Of them, 273 were retrospectively analyzed after categorization into 3 groups based on the preadmission CFS (CFS 1–3, 140 patients; CFS 4–5, 99 patients; and CFS 6–8, 34 patients). We evaluated the influence of CFS on overall mortality at 2 years and on non-home discharge, defined as the composite of in-hospital death and new transfer to a hospital or nursing home. During the study period (median, 565 days), the overall mortality and ratio of non-home discharge increased as CFS increased. After adjustment for multivariable analysis, the severely frail continued to be significantly associated with an increased risk of overall mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 2.37; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11–5.05; P=0.026) and non-home discharge (adjusted odds ratio 9.50; 95% CI 3.48–25.99; P<0.001). Conclusions: Frailty, as assessed by CFS, had an influence on short- and mid-term prognoses in octogenarian patients with STEMI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-118
Number of pages10
JournalCirculation Journal
Volume84
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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