Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase augments lipopolysaccharide-induced cell proliferation in CD14-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells

D. Chakravortty, Y. Kato, T. Sugiyama, N. Koide, M. M. Mu, T. Yoshida, T. Yokochi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

CD14-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CD14-CHO) cells, established by transfection of human CD14 DNA, acquired high responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) through membrane-bound CD14 expression. LPS induced DNA synthesis and activated a series of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2), p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase, in CD14-CHO cells but not in mock-transfected CHO cells. Anti-CD14 antibody completely abrogated both LPS-induced DNA synthesis and LPS-induced phosphorylation of those MAP kinases, suggesting a critical role of membrane-bound CD14 in LPS signaling. A p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, SB203580, markedly augmented LPS-induced DNA synthesis in CD14-CHO cells, whereas an Erk1/2 inhibitor, PD98059, had no affect. On the other hand, SB203580 exhibited no effect on epidermal growth factor-induced DNA synthesis in CD14-CHO cells, although PD98059 inhibited it significantly. The activation and inactivation of p38 MAP kinase with dominant negative and dominant positive mutants also suggested the participation of p38 MAP kinase in LPS-induced DNA synthesis. It was therefore suggested that the activation of p38 MAP kinase can negatively regulate LPS-induced cell proliferation in CD14-CHO cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)931-936
Number of pages6
JournalInfection and Immunity
Volume69
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Parasitology
  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

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