Insulin-mediated effects of alcohol intake on serum lipid levels in a general population: The Hisayama Study

Isao Kato, Yutaka Kiyohara, Michiaki Kubo, Yumihiro Tanizaki, Hisatomi Arima, Hiromitsu Iwamoto, Noriyasu Shinohara, Keizo Nakayama, Masatoshi Fujishima

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Abstract

To determine whether the beneficial effects of alcohol on lipid concentrations are mediated by insulin levels, we performed a cross-sectional analysis in 2103 nondiabetic men and women aged 40 to 79 years from a general Japanese population in Hisayama. The multivariate-adjusted sum of fasting and 2-hour postloading insulin levels and the insulin resistance index significantly decreased with elevating alcohol intake levels in men (P < 0.01 for the trend) but not in women. No dose-response relations between alcohol intake and glucose levels were observed. In both sexes, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) significantly increased with elevated alcohol intake (P < 0.01), whereas total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC) were inversely correlated with alcohol intake (P < 0.01). In contrast, triglycerides (TGs) levels in men showed a J-shaped relation to alcohol dose, with moderate drinkers (10-29 g/d) having the lowest levels. Estimates using regression models indicated that for men, 10% of the alcohol-induced increase in HDLC and 2% of the alcohol-induced decrease in LDLC were insulin mediated. It was also estimated for male subjects that 36% of the reduction in TGs due to low to moderate alcohol intake was mediated by low levels of insulin and that this insulin-mediated pathway reduced the positive alcohol-TG relation by 13% in cases of moderate to heavy drinking. Our data suggest that regular alcohol consumption dose-dependently increased insulin sensitivity among male nondiabetics, but the insulin-mediated beneficial effects of alcohol on lipid concentrations were relatively small.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)196-204
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume56
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-02-2003

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Alcohols
Insulin
Lipids
Serum
Population
Triglycerides
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Insulin Resistance
HDL2 Lipoprotein
Alcohol Drinking
Drinking
Fasting
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cholesterol
Glucose

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Kato, Isao ; Kiyohara, Yutaka ; Kubo, Michiaki ; Tanizaki, Yumihiro ; Arima, Hisatomi ; Iwamoto, Hiromitsu ; Shinohara, Noriyasu ; Nakayama, Keizo ; Fujishima, Masatoshi. / Insulin-mediated effects of alcohol intake on serum lipid levels in a general population : The Hisayama Study. In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology. 2003 ; Vol. 56, No. 2. pp. 196-204.
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Kato, I, Kiyohara, Y, Kubo, M, Tanizaki, Y, Arima, H, Iwamoto, H, Shinohara, N, Nakayama, K & Fujishima, M 2003, 'Insulin-mediated effects of alcohol intake on serum lipid levels in a general population: The Hisayama Study', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, vol. 56, no. 2, pp. 196-204. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0895-4356(02)00578-4

Insulin-mediated effects of alcohol intake on serum lipid levels in a general population : The Hisayama Study. / Kato, Isao; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanizaki, Yumihiro; Arima, Hisatomi; Iwamoto, Hiromitsu; Shinohara, Noriyasu; Nakayama, Keizo; Fujishima, Masatoshi.

In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 56, No. 2, 01.02.2003, p. 196-204.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Insulin-mediated effects of alcohol intake on serum lipid levels in a general population

T2 - The Hisayama Study

AU - Kato, Isao

AU - Kiyohara, Yutaka

AU - Kubo, Michiaki

AU - Tanizaki, Yumihiro

AU - Arima, Hisatomi

AU - Iwamoto, Hiromitsu

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AU - Nakayama, Keizo

AU - Fujishima, Masatoshi

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