Internal Carotid Artery Tortuosity: Impact on Mechanical Thrombectomy

Junpei Koge, Kanta Tanaka, Takeshi Yoshimoto, Masayuki Shiozawa, Yuji Kushi, Tsuyoshi Ohta, Tetsu Satow, Hiroharu Kataoka, Masafumi Ihara, Masatoshi Koga, Noriko Isobe, Kazunori Toyoda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although tortuosity of the internal carotid artery (ICA) can pose a significant challenge when performing mechanical thrombectomy, few studies have examined the impact of ICA tortuosity on mechanical thrombectomy outcomes. Methods: In a registry-based hospital cohort, consecutive patients with anterior circulation stroke in whom mechanical thrombectomy was attempted were divided into 2 groups: those with tortuosity in the extracranial or cavernous ICA (tortuous group) and those without (nontortuous group). The extracranial ICA tortuosity was defined as the presence of coiling or kinking. The cavernous ICA tortuosity was defined by the posterior deflection of the posterior genu or the shape resembling Simmons-type catheter. Outcomes included first pass effect (FPE; extended Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction score 2c/3 after first pass), favorable outcome (3-month modified Rankin Scale score of 0-2), and intracranial hemorrhage. Results: Of 370 patients, 124 were in the tortuous group (extracranial ICA tortuosity, 35; cavernous ICA tortuosity, 70; tortuosity at both sites, 19). The tortuous group showed a higher proportion of women and atrial fibrillation than the nontortuous group. FPE was less frequently achieved in the tortuous group than the nontortuous group (21% versus 39%; adjusted odds ratio, 0.45 [95% CI, 0.26-0.77]). ICA tortuosity was independently associated with the longer time from puncture to extended Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction ≥2b reperfusion (β=23.19 [95% CI, 13.44-32.94]). Favorable outcome was similar between groups (46% versus 48%; P=0.87). Frequencies of any intracranial hemorrhage (54% versus 42%; adjusted odds ratio, 1.61 [95% CI, 1.02-2.53]) and parenchymal hematoma (11% versus 6%; adjusted odds ratio, 2.41 [95% CI, 1.04-5.58]) were higher in the tortuous group. In the tortuous group, the FPE rate was similar in patients who underwent combined stent retriever and contact aspiration thrombectomy and in those who underwent either procedure alone (22% versus 19%; P=0.80). However, in the nontortuous group, the FPE rate was significantly higher in patients who underwent combined stent retriever and contact aspiration (52% versus 35%; P=0.02). Conclusions: ICA tortuosity was independently associated with reduced likelihood of FPE and increased risk of postmechanical thrombectomy intracranial hemorrhage. Registration: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov; Unique identifier: NCT02251665.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2458-2467
Number of pages10
JournalStroke
Volume53
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-08-2022
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Advanced and Specialised Nursing

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