Isolation of human monoclonal antibodies that bind to two different antigens and are encoded by germline VH and VL genes

M. Sumitomo-Kondo, Y. Ukai, Y. Iba, Nobuko Oshima, K. Miura, A. Takasaki, Y. Kurosawa, G. Kurosawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper reports isolation of two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to both a membrane protein and a cytoplasmic protein. Most Abs established as markers for autoimmune disease bind to cytoplasmic or nuclear substances. However, it remains unknown how these Abs are produced. On the other hand, there were examples where clones originally isolated as Abs that bind to membrane proteins also showed binding activity to cytoplasmic or nuclear substances. Based on these results, the following hypothesis has been proposed. The Abs that had been originally produced against a membrane protein showed cross-reactivity against cytoplasmic or nuclear substances. In the present study we reported isolation of Abs that bound to both a membrane protein, CADM1, and a cytoplasmic protein, α-actinin-4. The method adopted in the present study could be generally applicable to isolation of Abs showing such dual specificity. Firstly, we constructed a huge human Ab library using various organs including naïve B-cell-rich organs such as bone marrow and umbilical cords. Then, we developed a comprehensive screening method for isolation of Abs that bound to cell surface antigens. Through extensive screenings with many kinds of cell we newly obtained a library composed of around 4000 independent clones that bind to membrane proteins. We screened this library with α-actinin-4 and succeeded in isolating two Abs. They bound to α-actinin-4 and a membrane protein CADM1. Furthermore, they are encoded by naïve heavy and light chain variable genes (VH & VL). These results suggested that cross-reactive Abs to both a membrane protein and a cytoplasmic protein could be present in germline repertoire of Ab in humans. This methodology adopted in the present study could be applied to isolation of cross-reactive Abs possibly involved in autoimmune diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1141-1147
Number of pages7
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume503
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 05-09-2018

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Membrane Proteins
Genes
Monoclonal Antibodies
Antigens
Actinin
Libraries
Autoimmune Diseases
Screening
Clone Cells
Proteins
Umbilical Cord
Surface Antigens
Bone
B-Lymphocytes
Bone Marrow
Cells
Light

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Sumitomo-Kondo, M. ; Ukai, Y. ; Iba, Y. ; Oshima, Nobuko ; Miura, K. ; Takasaki, A. ; Kurosawa, Y. ; Kurosawa, G. / Isolation of human monoclonal antibodies that bind to two different antigens and are encoded by germline VH and VL genes. In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. 2018 ; Vol. 503, No. 2. pp. 1141-1147.
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Isolation of human monoclonal antibodies that bind to two different antigens and are encoded by germline VH and VL genes. / Sumitomo-Kondo, M.; Ukai, Y.; Iba, Y.; Oshima, Nobuko; Miura, K.; Takasaki, A.; Kurosawa, Y.; Kurosawa, G.

In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, Vol. 503, No. 2, 05.09.2018, p. 1141-1147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Sumitomo-Kondo, M.

AU - Ukai, Y.

AU - Iba, Y.

AU - Oshima, Nobuko

AU - Miura, K.

AU - Takasaki, A.

AU - Kurosawa, Y.

AU - Kurosawa, G.

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