Job strain, worksite support, and nutrient intake among employed Japanese men and women

Norito Kawakami, Akizumi Tsutsumi, Takashi Haratani, Fumio Kobayashi, Masao Ishizaki, Takeshi Hayashi, Osamu Fujita, Yoshiharu Aizawa, Shogo Miyazaki, Hisanori Hiro, Takeshi Masumoto, Shuji Hashimoto, Shunichi Araki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The association of job strain (as defined by the job demands/ control model) and worksite support with nutrient intake is not clear. Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted of 25,104 workers employed in nine companies in Japan. Job strain and worksite support were assessed using the Job Content Questionnaire. Daily intake of 17 nutrients was measured using a dietary history questionnaire. Data from 15,295 men and 2,853 women were analyzed, controlling for age, education, marital status, occupation, and study site. Results: Among men, job strain was positively associated with average daily intakes of fat, vitamin E, cholesterol, poly- and mono-unsaturated fatty acids (p for trend<0.05), and worksite support was positively associated with average daily intakes of total energy, crude fiber, retinol, carotene, vitamins A, C, and E, cholesterol, and saturated fatty acid (p for trend<0.05). Among women, worksite support was positively associated with average daily intakes of total energy, protein, vitamin E, and polyunsaturated fatty acid (p for trend<0.05). However these differences were generally small. Conclusions: The present study showed that job strain and worksite support were only weakly and inconsistently associated with nutritional intakes. It does not seem that changes in nutritional intakes explain the association between job strain or worksite support and coronary heart disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-89
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of epidemiology
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14-03-2006

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Workplace
Food
Vitamin E
Energy Intake
Vitamin A
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Cholesterol
Marital Status
Carotenoids
Occupations
Ascorbic Acid
Coronary Disease
Japan
Fatty Acids
Fats
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Kawakami, N., Tsutsumi, A., Haratani, T., Kobayashi, F., Ishizaki, M., Hayashi, T., ... Araki, S. (2006). Job strain, worksite support, and nutrient intake among employed Japanese men and women. Journal of epidemiology, 16(2), 79-89. https://doi.org/10.2188/jea.16.79
Kawakami, Norito ; Tsutsumi, Akizumi ; Haratani, Takashi ; Kobayashi, Fumio ; Ishizaki, Masao ; Hayashi, Takeshi ; Fujita, Osamu ; Aizawa, Yoshiharu ; Miyazaki, Shogo ; Hiro, Hisanori ; Masumoto, Takeshi ; Hashimoto, Shuji ; Araki, Shunichi. / Job strain, worksite support, and nutrient intake among employed Japanese men and women. In: Journal of epidemiology. 2006 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 79-89.
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Kawakami, N, Tsutsumi, A, Haratani, T, Kobayashi, F, Ishizaki, M, Hayashi, T, Fujita, O, Aizawa, Y, Miyazaki, S, Hiro, H, Masumoto, T, Hashimoto, S & Araki, S 2006, 'Job strain, worksite support, and nutrient intake among employed Japanese men and women', Journal of epidemiology, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 79-89. https://doi.org/10.2188/jea.16.79

Job strain, worksite support, and nutrient intake among employed Japanese men and women. / Kawakami, Norito; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Haratani, Takashi; Kobayashi, Fumio; Ishizaki, Masao; Hayashi, Takeshi; Fujita, Osamu; Aizawa, Yoshiharu; Miyazaki, Shogo; Hiro, Hisanori; Masumoto, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Shuji; Araki, Shunichi.

In: Journal of epidemiology, Vol. 16, No. 2, 14.03.2006, p. 79-89.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Job strain, worksite support, and nutrient intake among employed Japanese men and women

AU - Kawakami, Norito

AU - Tsutsumi, Akizumi

AU - Haratani, Takashi

AU - Kobayashi, Fumio

AU - Ishizaki, Masao

AU - Hayashi, Takeshi

AU - Fujita, Osamu

AU - Aizawa, Yoshiharu

AU - Miyazaki, Shogo

AU - Hiro, Hisanori

AU - Masumoto, Takeshi

AU - Hashimoto, Shuji

AU - Araki, Shunichi

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N2 - Background: The association of job strain (as defined by the job demands/ control model) and worksite support with nutrient intake is not clear. Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted of 25,104 workers employed in nine companies in Japan. Job strain and worksite support were assessed using the Job Content Questionnaire. Daily intake of 17 nutrients was measured using a dietary history questionnaire. Data from 15,295 men and 2,853 women were analyzed, controlling for age, education, marital status, occupation, and study site. Results: Among men, job strain was positively associated with average daily intakes of fat, vitamin E, cholesterol, poly- and mono-unsaturated fatty acids (p for trend<0.05), and worksite support was positively associated with average daily intakes of total energy, crude fiber, retinol, carotene, vitamins A, C, and E, cholesterol, and saturated fatty acid (p for trend<0.05). Among women, worksite support was positively associated with average daily intakes of total energy, protein, vitamin E, and polyunsaturated fatty acid (p for trend<0.05). However these differences were generally small. Conclusions: The present study showed that job strain and worksite support were only weakly and inconsistently associated with nutritional intakes. It does not seem that changes in nutritional intakes explain the association between job strain or worksite support and coronary heart disease.

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Kawakami N, Tsutsumi A, Haratani T, Kobayashi F, Ishizaki M, Hayashi T et al. Job strain, worksite support, and nutrient intake among employed Japanese men and women. Journal of epidemiology. 2006 Mar 14;16(2):79-89. https://doi.org/10.2188/jea.16.79