Marked increases in concentrations of apolipoprotein in the cerebrospinal fluid of poliovirus-infected macaques: Relations between apolipoprotein concentrations and severity of brain injury

Kuniaki Saito, Mitsuru Seishima, Melvyn P. Heyes, Hua Song, Suwako Fujigaki, Satoshi Maeda, James H. Vickers, Akio Noma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Apolipoproteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) might have important functional roles in the pathophysiology of brain and lipid metabolism in the vascular component. The present study examined apolipoprotein A-I (apo-A-I) and apolipoprotein E (apo-E) levels in CSF and serum from poliovirus-infected macaques. Poliovirus-infected macaques developed motor deficits and were classified into three groups: (1) muscle weakness in one or both legs; (2) partial paralysis in one or both legs; (3) complete paralysis in one or both legs. No motor deficits were evident in the control or sham-treated macaques. Apo-A-I concentrations in CSF were markedly elevated in poliovirus-infected macaques with weakness, partial or complete paralysis, in comparison with either control or sham-treated animals, and were proportional to the severity of motor impairment. Apo-E concentrations in CSF were also significantly elevated in poliovirus-infected macaques with complete paralysis. The magnitude of increase in CSF apo-A-I or apo-E concentrations was also closely associated with the degree of histologic neurological damage and inflammation (lesion scores). However, no changes in serum apo-A-I and apo-E concentrations were observed in the poliovirus-infected macaques compared with control macaques. Furthermore there were no significant correlations apo-A-I or apo-E concentrations between serum and CSF. We hypothesize that the elevation of apo-A-I and apo-E concentrations after poliovirus infection is caused by immune stimulation within the central nervous system (CNS). Measures of CSF apo-A-I and apo-E levels might serve as a useful marker for the severity and/or the range of CNS injury.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)145-149
Number of pages5
JournalBiochemical Journal
Volume321
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cerebrospinal fluid
Poliovirus
Apolipoproteins
Apolipoprotein A-I
Macaca
Apolipoproteins E
Brain Injuries
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Brain
Paralysis
Leg
Neurology
Central Nervous System
Serum
Nervous System Trauma
Muscle Weakness
Lipid Metabolism
Blood Vessels
Muscle
Animals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Saito, Kuniaki ; Seishima, Mitsuru ; Heyes, Melvyn P. ; Song, Hua ; Fujigaki, Suwako ; Maeda, Satoshi ; Vickers, James H. ; Noma, Akio. / Marked increases in concentrations of apolipoprotein in the cerebrospinal fluid of poliovirus-infected macaques : Relations between apolipoprotein concentrations and severity of brain injury. In: Biochemical Journal. 1997 ; Vol. 321, No. 1. pp. 145-149.
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Marked increases in concentrations of apolipoprotein in the cerebrospinal fluid of poliovirus-infected macaques : Relations between apolipoprotein concentrations and severity of brain injury. / Saito, Kuniaki; Seishima, Mitsuru; Heyes, Melvyn P.; Song, Hua; Fujigaki, Suwako; Maeda, Satoshi; Vickers, James H.; Noma, Akio.

In: Biochemical Journal, Vol. 321, No. 1, 01.01.1997, p. 145-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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