Matrix metalloproteinases contribute to neuronal dysfunction in animal models of drug dependence, Alzheimer's disease, and epilepsy

Hiroyuki Mizoguchi, Kiyofumi Yamada, Toshitaka Nabeshima

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) remodel the pericellular environment by regulating the cleavage of extracellular matrix proteins, cell surface components, neurotransmitter receptors, and growth factors that mediate cell adhesion, synaptogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and long-term potentiation. Interestingly, increased MMP activity and dysregulation of the balance between MMPs and TIMPs have also been implicated in various pathologic conditions. In this paper, we discuss various animal models that suggest that the activation of the gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 is involved in pathogenesis of drug dependence, Alzheimer's disease, and epilepsy.

Original languageEnglish
Article number681385
JournalBiochemistry Research International
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry

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