Memantine for lewy body disorders: Systematic review and meta-analysis

Shinji Matsunaga, Taro Kishi, Nakao Iwata

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To clarify whether memantine is more efficacious in several outcomes and safer than placebo in patients with Lewy body disorders, we performed a meta-analysis of memantine in patients with Lewy body disorders. Methods The meta-analysis included randomized controlled trials of memantine for Lewy body disorders in all patients with Lewy body disorders. Motor function, activities of daily living, Neuropsychiatric Inventory, Mini-Mental State Exam, discontinuation rate, and individual side effects were evaluated. Results No significant effects of memantine on motor function scores, Mini-Mental State Exam scores, Neuropsychiatric Inventory scores, and activity of daily living scores were found. However, memantine was superior to placebo in Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change scores (standardized mean difference: -0.26; 95% confidence interval: -0.51 to -0.02; z = 2.08; p = 0.04; two studies; N = 258). Dropout due to all causes, inefficacy, or adverse events were similar in both groups. Moreover, no significant differences in serious adverse events, somnolence/tiredness, stroke, dizziness/vertigo, and confusion were found between the groups. Conclusion Our results suggest that memantine did not have a benefit for the treatment of Lewy body disorders in cognition and motor function. However, memantine may be superior to placebo for the overall impression of the disorders. Further, memantine is well tolerated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)373-383
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2015

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Memantine
Lewy Bodies
Meta-Analysis
Placebos
Activities of Daily Living
Cognition Disorders
Confusion
Equipment and Supplies
Vertigo
Dizziness
Alzheimer Disease
Motor Activity
Randomized Controlled Trials
Stroke
Confidence Intervals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective To clarify whether memantine is more efficacious in several outcomes and safer than placebo in patients with Lewy body disorders, we performed a meta-analysis of memantine in patients with Lewy body disorders. Methods The meta-analysis included randomized controlled trials of memantine for Lewy body disorders in all patients with Lewy body disorders. Motor function, activities of daily living, Neuropsychiatric Inventory, Mini-Mental State Exam, discontinuation rate, and individual side effects were evaluated. Results No significant effects of memantine on motor function scores, Mini-Mental State Exam scores, Neuropsychiatric Inventory scores, and activity of daily living scores were found. However, memantine was superior to placebo in Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change scores (standardized mean difference: -0.26; 95{\%} confidence interval: -0.51 to -0.02; z = 2.08; p = 0.04; two studies; N = 258). Dropout due to all causes, inefficacy, or adverse events were similar in both groups. Moreover, no significant differences in serious adverse events, somnolence/tiredness, stroke, dizziness/vertigo, and confusion were found between the groups. Conclusion Our results suggest that memantine did not have a benefit for the treatment of Lewy body disorders in cognition and motor function. However, memantine may be superior to placebo for the overall impression of the disorders. Further, memantine is well tolerated.",
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Memantine for lewy body disorders : Systematic review and meta-analysis. / Matsunaga, Shinji; Kishi, Taro; Iwata, Nakao.

In: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 23, No. 4, 01.01.2015, p. 373-383.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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N2 - Objective To clarify whether memantine is more efficacious in several outcomes and safer than placebo in patients with Lewy body disorders, we performed a meta-analysis of memantine in patients with Lewy body disorders. Methods The meta-analysis included randomized controlled trials of memantine for Lewy body disorders in all patients with Lewy body disorders. Motor function, activities of daily living, Neuropsychiatric Inventory, Mini-Mental State Exam, discontinuation rate, and individual side effects were evaluated. Results No significant effects of memantine on motor function scores, Mini-Mental State Exam scores, Neuropsychiatric Inventory scores, and activity of daily living scores were found. However, memantine was superior to placebo in Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change scores (standardized mean difference: -0.26; 95% confidence interval: -0.51 to -0.02; z = 2.08; p = 0.04; two studies; N = 258). Dropout due to all causes, inefficacy, or adverse events were similar in both groups. Moreover, no significant differences in serious adverse events, somnolence/tiredness, stroke, dizziness/vertigo, and confusion were found between the groups. Conclusion Our results suggest that memantine did not have a benefit for the treatment of Lewy body disorders in cognition and motor function. However, memantine may be superior to placebo for the overall impression of the disorders. Further, memantine is well tolerated.

AB - Objective To clarify whether memantine is more efficacious in several outcomes and safer than placebo in patients with Lewy body disorders, we performed a meta-analysis of memantine in patients with Lewy body disorders. Methods The meta-analysis included randomized controlled trials of memantine for Lewy body disorders in all patients with Lewy body disorders. Motor function, activities of daily living, Neuropsychiatric Inventory, Mini-Mental State Exam, discontinuation rate, and individual side effects were evaluated. Results No significant effects of memantine on motor function scores, Mini-Mental State Exam scores, Neuropsychiatric Inventory scores, and activity of daily living scores were found. However, memantine was superior to placebo in Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change scores (standardized mean difference: -0.26; 95% confidence interval: -0.51 to -0.02; z = 2.08; p = 0.04; two studies; N = 258). Dropout due to all causes, inefficacy, or adverse events were similar in both groups. Moreover, no significant differences in serious adverse events, somnolence/tiredness, stroke, dizziness/vertigo, and confusion were found between the groups. Conclusion Our results suggest that memantine did not have a benefit for the treatment of Lewy body disorders in cognition and motor function. However, memantine may be superior to placebo for the overall impression of the disorders. Further, memantine is well tolerated.

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