Metabolic syndrome, sarcopenia and role of sex and age: Cross-sectional analysis of Kashiwa cohort study

for the Kashiwa Study Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that effects of cardiovascular risk factors may vary depending on sex and age. In this study, we assessed the associations of metabolic syndrome (MetS) with sarcopenia and its components in older adults, and examined whether the associations vary by sex and age. We also tested if any one of the MetS components could explain the associations. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the baseline data from the cohort study conducted in Kashiwa city, Chiba, Japan in 2012 which included 1971 functionally-independent, community-dwelling Japanese adults aged 65 years or older (977 men, 994 women). Sarcopenia was defined based on appendicular skeletal muscle mass, grip strength and usual gait speed. MetS was defined based on the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel-III criteria. The prevalence of sarcopenia was 14.2% in men and 22.1% in women, while the prevalence of MetS was 43.6% in men and 28.9% in women. After adjustment for potential confounders, MetS was positively associated with sarcopenia in men aged 65 to 74 years (odds ratio 5.5; 95% confidence interval 1.9-15.9) but not in older men or women. Among the sarcopenia components, MetS was associated with lower muscle mass and grip strength, particularly in men aged 65 to 74 years. The associations of MetS with sarcopenia and its components were mainly driven by abdominal obesity regardless of sex or age. In conclusion, MetS is positively associated with sarcopenia in older men. The association is modified by sex and age, but abdominal obesity is the main contributor to the association across sex and age.

Original languageEnglish
Article number0112718
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18-11-2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

sarcopenia
Sarcopenia
metabolic syndrome
cohort studies
cross-sectional studies
Muscle
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
gender
Education
Cholesterol
Abdominal Obesity
Hand Strength
obesity
Independent Living
gait
odds ratio
skeletal muscle
confidence interval
Japan

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

@article{12bc42f2967c488e8a9bcecb0b89c73b,
title = "Metabolic syndrome, sarcopenia and role of sex and age: Cross-sectional analysis of Kashiwa cohort study",
abstract = "Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that effects of cardiovascular risk factors may vary depending on sex and age. In this study, we assessed the associations of metabolic syndrome (MetS) with sarcopenia and its components in older adults, and examined whether the associations vary by sex and age. We also tested if any one of the MetS components could explain the associations. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the baseline data from the cohort study conducted in Kashiwa city, Chiba, Japan in 2012 which included 1971 functionally-independent, community-dwelling Japanese adults aged 65 years or older (977 men, 994 women). Sarcopenia was defined based on appendicular skeletal muscle mass, grip strength and usual gait speed. MetS was defined based on the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel-III criteria. The prevalence of sarcopenia was 14.2{\%} in men and 22.1{\%} in women, while the prevalence of MetS was 43.6{\%} in men and 28.9{\%} in women. After adjustment for potential confounders, MetS was positively associated with sarcopenia in men aged 65 to 74 years (odds ratio 5.5; 95{\%} confidence interval 1.9-15.9) but not in older men or women. Among the sarcopenia components, MetS was associated with lower muscle mass and grip strength, particularly in men aged 65 to 74 years. The associations of MetS with sarcopenia and its components were mainly driven by abdominal obesity regardless of sex or age. In conclusion, MetS is positively associated with sarcopenia in older men. The association is modified by sex and age, but abdominal obesity is the main contributor to the association across sex and age.",
author = "{for the Kashiwa Study Investigators} and Shinya Ishii and Tomoki Tanaka and Masahiro Akishita and Yasuyoshi Ouchi and Tetsuo Tuji and Katsuya Iijima and Takeshi Kikutani and Takashi Higashiguchi and Kazuko Ishikawa-Takata and Obuchi, {Shuichi P.} and Koji Shibasaki and Masashi Suzuki and Yoshiya Oishi and Hirohiko Hirano and Yuki Ohara and Noriaki Takahashi and Hiroyasu Furuya and Hisashi Kawai and Seigo Mitsutake",
year = "2014",
month = "11",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0112718",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "11",

}

Metabolic syndrome, sarcopenia and role of sex and age : Cross-sectional analysis of Kashiwa cohort study. / for the Kashiwa Study Investigators.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 11, 0112718, 18.11.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metabolic syndrome, sarcopenia and role of sex and age

T2 - Cross-sectional analysis of Kashiwa cohort study

AU - for the Kashiwa Study Investigators

AU - Ishii, Shinya

AU - Tanaka, Tomoki

AU - Akishita, Masahiro

AU - Ouchi, Yasuyoshi

AU - Tuji, Tetsuo

AU - Iijima, Katsuya

AU - Kikutani, Takeshi

AU - Higashiguchi, Takashi

AU - Ishikawa-Takata, Kazuko

AU - Obuchi, Shuichi P.

AU - Shibasaki, Koji

AU - Suzuki, Masashi

AU - Oishi, Yoshiya

AU - Hirano, Hirohiko

AU - Ohara, Yuki

AU - Takahashi, Noriaki

AU - Furuya, Hiroyasu

AU - Kawai, Hisashi

AU - Mitsutake, Seigo

PY - 2014/11/18

Y1 - 2014/11/18

N2 - Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that effects of cardiovascular risk factors may vary depending on sex and age. In this study, we assessed the associations of metabolic syndrome (MetS) with sarcopenia and its components in older adults, and examined whether the associations vary by sex and age. We also tested if any one of the MetS components could explain the associations. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the baseline data from the cohort study conducted in Kashiwa city, Chiba, Japan in 2012 which included 1971 functionally-independent, community-dwelling Japanese adults aged 65 years or older (977 men, 994 women). Sarcopenia was defined based on appendicular skeletal muscle mass, grip strength and usual gait speed. MetS was defined based on the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel-III criteria. The prevalence of sarcopenia was 14.2% in men and 22.1% in women, while the prevalence of MetS was 43.6% in men and 28.9% in women. After adjustment for potential confounders, MetS was positively associated with sarcopenia in men aged 65 to 74 years (odds ratio 5.5; 95% confidence interval 1.9-15.9) but not in older men or women. Among the sarcopenia components, MetS was associated with lower muscle mass and grip strength, particularly in men aged 65 to 74 years. The associations of MetS with sarcopenia and its components were mainly driven by abdominal obesity regardless of sex or age. In conclusion, MetS is positively associated with sarcopenia in older men. The association is modified by sex and age, but abdominal obesity is the main contributor to the association across sex and age.

AB - Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that effects of cardiovascular risk factors may vary depending on sex and age. In this study, we assessed the associations of metabolic syndrome (MetS) with sarcopenia and its components in older adults, and examined whether the associations vary by sex and age. We also tested if any one of the MetS components could explain the associations. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the baseline data from the cohort study conducted in Kashiwa city, Chiba, Japan in 2012 which included 1971 functionally-independent, community-dwelling Japanese adults aged 65 years or older (977 men, 994 women). Sarcopenia was defined based on appendicular skeletal muscle mass, grip strength and usual gait speed. MetS was defined based on the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel-III criteria. The prevalence of sarcopenia was 14.2% in men and 22.1% in women, while the prevalence of MetS was 43.6% in men and 28.9% in women. After adjustment for potential confounders, MetS was positively associated with sarcopenia in men aged 65 to 74 years (odds ratio 5.5; 95% confidence interval 1.9-15.9) but not in older men or women. Among the sarcopenia components, MetS was associated with lower muscle mass and grip strength, particularly in men aged 65 to 74 years. The associations of MetS with sarcopenia and its components were mainly driven by abdominal obesity regardless of sex or age. In conclusion, MetS is positively associated with sarcopenia in older men. The association is modified by sex and age, but abdominal obesity is the main contributor to the association across sex and age.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84912122990&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84912122990&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0112718

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0112718

M3 - Article

C2 - 25405866

AN - SCOPUS:84912122990

VL - 9

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 11

M1 - 0112718

ER -