Mountain-Cultivated Ginseng Attenuates Phencyclidine-Induced Abnormal Behaviors in Mice by Positive Modulation of Glutathione in the Prefrontal Cortex of Mice

The Vinh Tran, Eun Joo Shin, Sung Kwon Ko, Yunsung Nam, Yoon Hee Chung, Ji Hoon Jeong, Choon Gon Jang, Seung Yeol Nah, Kiyofumi Yamada, Toshitaka Nabeshima, Jae Kyung Byun, Hyoung Chun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Escalating evidence indicates that ginseng treatment protects against psychotoxic behaviors and memory impairment. Although the underlying mechanism of schizophrenia remains elusive, recent investigations proposed that downregulation of glutathione (GSH) can be involved in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Since little is known about the effects of ginseng in a schizophrenia-like animal model, we selected mountain-cultivated ginseng (MG) from a variety of ginseng extracts to investigate the effect of ginseng on the psychosis induced by phencyclidine (PCP) in mice. PCP (10 mg/kg/day, s.c.) was administered for 14 consecutive days. Novel object recognition, forced swimming, and social interaction tests were performed during the withdrawal period of 7 days. In addition, behavioral sensitization to an acute challenge of PCP was evaluated. The parameters of the GSH-dependent system in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) were examined. MG (200 mg/kg, i.p./day) or antipsychotic clozapine (10 mg/kg, p.o./day) was administered for seven consecutive days after the final PCP treatment. PCP significantly produced abnormal behaviors, followed by increases in Nrf2 nuclear translocation, its DNA binding activity, and glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) mRNA expression in the PFC. PCP treatment significantly decreased GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) ratio and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. MG significantly attenuated abnormal behaviors and the decreases in GSH/GSSG ratio and GPx activity induced by PCP. MG attenuated the increases in Nrf2 activity and GCL expression caused by PCP. The protective potentials of MG were comparable to those of clozapine. MG ameliorates PCP-induced schizophrenia-like psychosis in mice through the positive modulation of the glutathione system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)961-969
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Medicinal Food
Volume19
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-10-2016

Fingerprint

Phencyclidine
Panax
Prefrontal Cortex
Glutathione
Glutathione Disulfide
Glutamate-Cysteine Ligase
Schizophrenia
Clozapine
Glutathione Peroxidase
Psychotic Disorders
Interpersonal Relations
Antipsychotic Agents
Down-Regulation
Animal Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Tran, The Vinh ; Shin, Eun Joo ; Ko, Sung Kwon ; Nam, Yunsung ; Chung, Yoon Hee ; Jeong, Ji Hoon ; Jang, Choon Gon ; Nah, Seung Yeol ; Yamada, Kiyofumi ; Nabeshima, Toshitaka ; Byun, Jae Kyung ; Kim, Hyoung Chun. / Mountain-Cultivated Ginseng Attenuates Phencyclidine-Induced Abnormal Behaviors in Mice by Positive Modulation of Glutathione in the Prefrontal Cortex of Mice. In: Journal of Medicinal Food. 2016 ; Vol. 19, No. 10. pp. 961-969.
@article{a35a54c0803d455c987f76af2f1c9d6c,
title = "Mountain-Cultivated Ginseng Attenuates Phencyclidine-Induced Abnormal Behaviors in Mice by Positive Modulation of Glutathione in the Prefrontal Cortex of Mice",
abstract = "Escalating evidence indicates that ginseng treatment protects against psychotoxic behaviors and memory impairment. Although the underlying mechanism of schizophrenia remains elusive, recent investigations proposed that downregulation of glutathione (GSH) can be involved in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Since little is known about the effects of ginseng in a schizophrenia-like animal model, we selected mountain-cultivated ginseng (MG) from a variety of ginseng extracts to investigate the effect of ginseng on the psychosis induced by phencyclidine (PCP) in mice. PCP (10 mg/kg/day, s.c.) was administered for 14 consecutive days. Novel object recognition, forced swimming, and social interaction tests were performed during the withdrawal period of 7 days. In addition, behavioral sensitization to an acute challenge of PCP was evaluated. The parameters of the GSH-dependent system in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) were examined. MG (200 mg/kg, i.p./day) or antipsychotic clozapine (10 mg/kg, p.o./day) was administered for seven consecutive days after the final PCP treatment. PCP significantly produced abnormal behaviors, followed by increases in Nrf2 nuclear translocation, its DNA binding activity, and glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) mRNA expression in the PFC. PCP treatment significantly decreased GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) ratio and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. MG significantly attenuated abnormal behaviors and the decreases in GSH/GSSG ratio and GPx activity induced by PCP. MG attenuated the increases in Nrf2 activity and GCL expression caused by PCP. The protective potentials of MG were comparable to those of clozapine. MG ameliorates PCP-induced schizophrenia-like psychosis in mice through the positive modulation of the glutathione system.",
author = "Tran, {The Vinh} and Shin, {Eun Joo} and Ko, {Sung Kwon} and Yunsung Nam and Chung, {Yoon Hee} and Jeong, {Ji Hoon} and Jang, {Choon Gon} and Nah, {Seung Yeol} and Kiyofumi Yamada and Toshitaka Nabeshima and Byun, {Jae Kyung} and Kim, {Hyoung Chun}",
year = "2016",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/jmf.2016.3751",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "961--969",
journal = "Journal of Medicinal Food",
issn = "1096-620X",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "10",

}

Mountain-Cultivated Ginseng Attenuates Phencyclidine-Induced Abnormal Behaviors in Mice by Positive Modulation of Glutathione in the Prefrontal Cortex of Mice. / Tran, The Vinh; Shin, Eun Joo; Ko, Sung Kwon; Nam, Yunsung; Chung, Yoon Hee; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Jang, Choon Gon; Nah, Seung Yeol; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Byun, Jae Kyung; Kim, Hyoung Chun.

In: Journal of Medicinal Food, Vol. 19, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 961-969.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mountain-Cultivated Ginseng Attenuates Phencyclidine-Induced Abnormal Behaviors in Mice by Positive Modulation of Glutathione in the Prefrontal Cortex of Mice

AU - Tran, The Vinh

AU - Shin, Eun Joo

AU - Ko, Sung Kwon

AU - Nam, Yunsung

AU - Chung, Yoon Hee

AU - Jeong, Ji Hoon

AU - Jang, Choon Gon

AU - Nah, Seung Yeol

AU - Yamada, Kiyofumi

AU - Nabeshima, Toshitaka

AU - Byun, Jae Kyung

AU - Kim, Hyoung Chun

PY - 2016/10/1

Y1 - 2016/10/1

N2 - Escalating evidence indicates that ginseng treatment protects against psychotoxic behaviors and memory impairment. Although the underlying mechanism of schizophrenia remains elusive, recent investigations proposed that downregulation of glutathione (GSH) can be involved in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Since little is known about the effects of ginseng in a schizophrenia-like animal model, we selected mountain-cultivated ginseng (MG) from a variety of ginseng extracts to investigate the effect of ginseng on the psychosis induced by phencyclidine (PCP) in mice. PCP (10 mg/kg/day, s.c.) was administered for 14 consecutive days. Novel object recognition, forced swimming, and social interaction tests were performed during the withdrawal period of 7 days. In addition, behavioral sensitization to an acute challenge of PCP was evaluated. The parameters of the GSH-dependent system in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) were examined. MG (200 mg/kg, i.p./day) or antipsychotic clozapine (10 mg/kg, p.o./day) was administered for seven consecutive days after the final PCP treatment. PCP significantly produced abnormal behaviors, followed by increases in Nrf2 nuclear translocation, its DNA binding activity, and glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) mRNA expression in the PFC. PCP treatment significantly decreased GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) ratio and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. MG significantly attenuated abnormal behaviors and the decreases in GSH/GSSG ratio and GPx activity induced by PCP. MG attenuated the increases in Nrf2 activity and GCL expression caused by PCP. The protective potentials of MG were comparable to those of clozapine. MG ameliorates PCP-induced schizophrenia-like psychosis in mice through the positive modulation of the glutathione system.

AB - Escalating evidence indicates that ginseng treatment protects against psychotoxic behaviors and memory impairment. Although the underlying mechanism of schizophrenia remains elusive, recent investigations proposed that downregulation of glutathione (GSH) can be involved in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Since little is known about the effects of ginseng in a schizophrenia-like animal model, we selected mountain-cultivated ginseng (MG) from a variety of ginseng extracts to investigate the effect of ginseng on the psychosis induced by phencyclidine (PCP) in mice. PCP (10 mg/kg/day, s.c.) was administered for 14 consecutive days. Novel object recognition, forced swimming, and social interaction tests were performed during the withdrawal period of 7 days. In addition, behavioral sensitization to an acute challenge of PCP was evaluated. The parameters of the GSH-dependent system in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) were examined. MG (200 mg/kg, i.p./day) or antipsychotic clozapine (10 mg/kg, p.o./day) was administered for seven consecutive days after the final PCP treatment. PCP significantly produced abnormal behaviors, followed by increases in Nrf2 nuclear translocation, its DNA binding activity, and glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) mRNA expression in the PFC. PCP treatment significantly decreased GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) ratio and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. MG significantly attenuated abnormal behaviors and the decreases in GSH/GSSG ratio and GPx activity induced by PCP. MG attenuated the increases in Nrf2 activity and GCL expression caused by PCP. The protective potentials of MG were comparable to those of clozapine. MG ameliorates PCP-induced schizophrenia-like psychosis in mice through the positive modulation of the glutathione system.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84992413056&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84992413056&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/jmf.2016.3751

DO - 10.1089/jmf.2016.3751

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84992413056

VL - 19

SP - 961

EP - 969

JO - Journal of Medicinal Food

JF - Journal of Medicinal Food

SN - 1096-620X

IS - 10

ER -