Neutrophil priming as a risk factor for surgical site infection in patients with colon cancer treated by laparoscopic surgery

Yuji Toiyama, Yoshinaga Okugawa, Tadanobu Shimura, Shozo Ide, Hiromi Yasuda, Hiroyuki Fujikawa, Yoshiki Okita, Takeshi Yokoe, Junichiro Hiro, Masaki Ohi, Masato Kusunoki

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study is to identify perioperative marker predicting postoperative surgical site infection (SSI) including with anastomotic leakage (AL) in curative colon cancer patients, laparoscopically. Methods: In total, 135 colon cancer patients (stage I-III) undergoing curative laparoscopic surgery between January 2004 and December 2013 were enrolled in this study. We collected data on clinicopathological factors, laboratory data on pre and postoperative day 3 (POD3) and tumor markers levels to assess the relation to surgical site infection (SSI) including with anastomotic leakage (AL). Results: SSI and AL occurred in 16 cases (5.6%) and 4 cases (3%), respectively. SSI and AL were not association with clinicopathological factors. Within laboratory data and tumor markers preoperatively, high neutrophil counts were significantly associated with SSI (P < 0.05) and AL (P < 0.01), respectively. Area under curves (AUC) of SSI and AL were 0.656 and 0.854, respectively. In addition, high neutrophil counts on POD3 also were significantly associated with SSI (P < 0.01) and AL (P < 0.01), respectively. Area under curves (AUC) of SSI and AL were 0.747 and 0.832, respectively. Conclusion: Neutrophil count on pre and POD3 are potentially valuable indicators of SSI including with AL in colon cancer patients undergoing curative surgery laparoscopically.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5
JournalBMC Surgery
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 06-01-2020
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

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