No association between prostate apoptosis response 4 gene (PAWR) in schizophrenia and mood disorders in a Japanese population

Taro Kishi, Masashi Ikeda, Tsuyoshi Kitajima, Tatsuyo Suzuki, Yoshio Yamanouchi, Yoko Kinoshita, Kunihiro Kawashima, Norio Ozaki, Nakao Iwata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Altered dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) is hypothesized to be a susceptibility factor for major psychosis. Recent studies showed that a new intracellular protein, prostate apoptosis response 4 (Par-4), plays a critical role in D2R signaling. We conducted a genetic association analysis between Par-4 gene (PAWR) and schizophrenia and mood disorders in a Japanese population (schizophrenia: 556 cases, bipolar disorder (BP): 150 cases, major depressive disorder (MDD): 312 cases and 466 controls). Applying the recommended 'gene-based' association analysis, we selected five tagging SNPs in PAWR from the HapMap database. No significant association was obtained found with schizophrenia or MDD or BP. We found a significant association of one tagging SNP with BP in a genotype-wise analysis (P = 0.0396); however, this might be resulted from type I error due to multiple testing (P = 0.158 after SNPSpD correction). Considering the size of our sample and strategy, our results suggest that the PAWR does not play a major role in schizophrenia or mood disorders in the Japanese population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)531-534
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics, Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics
Volume147
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 05-06-2008

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Mood Disorders
Prostate
Schizophrenia
Bipolar Disorder
Apoptosis
Major Depressive Disorder
Population
Genes
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
HapMap Project
Dopamine D2 Receptors
Psychotic Disorders
Sample Size
Genotype
Databases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

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title = "No association between prostate apoptosis response 4 gene (PAWR) in schizophrenia and mood disorders in a Japanese population",
abstract = "Altered dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) is hypothesized to be a susceptibility factor for major psychosis. Recent studies showed that a new intracellular protein, prostate apoptosis response 4 (Par-4), plays a critical role in D2R signaling. We conducted a genetic association analysis between Par-4 gene (PAWR) and schizophrenia and mood disorders in a Japanese population (schizophrenia: 556 cases, bipolar disorder (BP): 150 cases, major depressive disorder (MDD): 312 cases and 466 controls). Applying the recommended 'gene-based' association analysis, we selected five tagging SNPs in PAWR from the HapMap database. No significant association was obtained found with schizophrenia or MDD or BP. We found a significant association of one tagging SNP with BP in a genotype-wise analysis (P = 0.0396); however, this might be resulted from type I error due to multiple testing (P = 0.158 after SNPSpD correction). Considering the size of our sample and strategy, our results suggest that the PAWR does not play a major role in schizophrenia or mood disorders in the Japanese population.",
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No association between prostate apoptosis response 4 gene (PAWR) in schizophrenia and mood disorders in a Japanese population. / Kishi, Taro; Ikeda, Masashi; Kitajima, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Tatsuyo; Yamanouchi, Yoshio; Kinoshita, Yoko; Kawashima, Kunihiro; Ozaki, Norio; Iwata, Nakao.

In: American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, Vol. 147, No. 4, 05.06.2008, p. 531-534.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Suzuki, Tatsuyo

AU - Yamanouchi, Yoshio

AU - Kinoshita, Yoko

AU - Kawashima, Kunihiro

AU - Ozaki, Norio

AU - Iwata, Nakao

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