Nursing management for temporary lodging facilities in Japan in the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic: A multiple-case study

Ryohei Kida, Yukie Takemura, Maho Inoue, Naoko Ichikawa, Hiroe Koyanagi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: Temporary lodging facilities which were non-medical facilities were established to secure beds for severely and moderately ill patients with COVID-19, as well as for isolation, non-contact observation, and care of mildly ill and asymptomatic patients in Japan. This study aims to understand nursing management practices adopted in these facilities by examining cases of their establishment and operation. Methods: A multiple-case study design was used. Interviews for qualitative data collection were conducted from August to October 2020. After analyzing the nursing management practices in four temporary lodging facilities, common points were collated and integrated. Results: For the establishment and operation of temporary lodging facilities, a three-layer structure based on disaster management methods was adopted: headquarters at the helm as overseers, field supervisors in the middle, and frontline nursing staff at the base. The structure had clear roles, facilitated information exchange, and provided efficient and effective nursing care. Field supervisors mainly provided psychological and clinical support for staff and served as information and interprofessional hubs. Conclusion: It is recommended that temporary lodging facilities should be organized based on principles of the division of labor. The workforce should comprise nursing staff, and experienced nursing professionals should be recruited to the higher echelons.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJapan Journal of Nursing Science
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Research and Theory

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