Oral Valganciclovir Therapy in Infants Aged ≤2 Months with Congenital Cytomegalovirus Disease: A Multicenter, Single-Arm, Open-Label Clinical Trial in Japan

Ichiro Morioka, Yasumasa Kakei, Takashi Omori, Kandai Nozu, Kazumichi Fujioka, Naoto Takahashi, Tetsushi Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki Moriuchi, Yoshinori Ito, Akira Oka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Our aims were to determine the clinical impact of oral valganciclovir (VGCV) in infants aged ≤2 months with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease and evaluate the efficacy of VGCV when initiated beyond the neonatal period. The multicenter, single-arm, open-label clinical trial was conducted in Japan. Twenty-five infants aged ≤2 months with congenital CMV disease involving the central nervous system were enrolled and treated with VGCV for 6 months. The primary endpoint was the change in the whole blood CMV load before and after treatment. The secondary endpoint was the change in the auditory brainstem response (ABR) before and after treatment. Changes in ABR were assessed between the younger and older age groups (≤ and >30 days at treatment initiation). Of the 25 patients, one was excluded owing to epilepsy before VGCV administration. The median change in the CMV DNA level in whole blood was −246.0 IU/mL. The best ear and total ear assessments based on ABR were categorized as (improved + unchanged) after treatment for 100% and 93.8%, respectively. No differences in hearing efficacy were observed between the younger and older age groups. Oral VGCV is a potential therapeutic option for treating infants aged ≤2 months with congenital CMV disease.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3582
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume11
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-07-2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Oral Valganciclovir Therapy in Infants Aged ≤2 Months with Congenital Cytomegalovirus Disease: A Multicenter, Single-Arm, Open-Label Clinical Trial in Japan'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this