Oxygen-enhanced MR ventilation imaging of the lung: Preliminary clinical experience in 25 subjects

Y. Ohno, H. Hatabu, D. Takenaka, S. Adachi, M. Van Cauteren, K. Sugimura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to show the feasibility of oxygen-enhanced MR ventilation imaging in a clinical setting with correlation to standard pulmonary function tests, high-resolution CT, and 81mKr ventilation scintigraphy. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Seven healthy volunteers, 10 lung cancer patients, and eight lung cancer patients with pulmonary emphysema were studied. A respiratory synchronized inversion-recovery single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequence (TE, 16; inversion time, 720 msec; interecho spacing, 4 msec) was used for data acquisition. The following paradigm of oxygen inhalation was used: 21% oxygen (room air), 100% oxygen, 21% oxygen. MR imaging data including maximum mean relative enhancement ratio and mean slope of relative enhancement were correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 sec, diffusing lung capacity, high-resolution CT emphysema score, and mean distribution ratio of 81mKr ventilation scintigraphy. RESULTS. Oxygen-enhanced MR ventilation images were obtained in all subjects. Maximum mean relative enhancement ratio and mean slope of relative enhancement of lung cancer patients were significantly decreased compared with those of the healthy volunteers (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001). The mean slope of relative enhancement in lung cancer patients with pulmonary emphysema was significantly lower than that of lung cancer patients without pulmonary emphysema (p < 0.0001). Maximum mean relative enhancement ratio (r2 = 0.81) was excellently correlated with diffusing lung capacity. Mean slope of relative enhancement (r2 = 0.74) was strongly correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 sec. Maximum mean relative enhancement had good correlation with the high-resolution CT emphysema score (r2 = 0.38). The maximum mean relative enhancement had a strong correlation with the distribution ratio (r2 = 0.77). CONCLUSION. Oxygen-enhanced MR ventilation imaging in human subjects showed regional changes in ventilation, thus reflecting regional lung function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)185-194
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume177
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Oxygen-enhanced MR ventilation imaging of the lung: Preliminary clinical experience in 25 subjects'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this