Personality and body mass index

A cross-sectional analysis from the Miyagi Cohort Study

Masako Kakizaki, Shinichi Kuriyama, Yuki Sato, Taichi Shimazu, Kaori Matsuda-Ohmori, Naoki Nakaya, Akira Fukao, Shin Fukudo, Ichiro Tsuji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Obesity is an increasingly prevalent public health problem worldwide, and is associated with a higher risk of developing various noncommunicable diseases. To further examine the association between personality and overweight, obesity, or underweight, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis in Japan. We hypothesized that extraversion and psychoticism would have a positive association with overweight, and that neuroticism and lie would have an inverse association with overweight, whereas the association between personality and underweight would be the reverse image of overweight. Methods: In 1990, 30,722 subjects (40-64 years of age) completed a self-administered questionnaire including body weight and height and the Japanese version of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised Short Form. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratios for overweight [body mass index (BMI)≥25.0 kg/m2] or underweight (BMI<18.5) relative to each category on the personality subscale. Results: In men and women, extraversion and psychoticism had positive associations with overweight, whereas neuroticism had an inverse association. Lie had an inverse association with overweight in men. In men and women, only extraversion had an inverse association with underweight and neuroticism had a positive association with underweight. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that personality is associated with both overweight and underweight. These results may provide clues to devising more effective measures for preventing overweight, obesity, or underweight or for weight control intervention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-80
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Volume64
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2008

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Thinness
Personality
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Obesity
Body Height
Japan
Public Health
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Body Weight
Regression Analysis
Weights and Measures
Neuroticism
Extraversion (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Kakizaki, Masako ; Kuriyama, Shinichi ; Sato, Yuki ; Shimazu, Taichi ; Matsuda-Ohmori, Kaori ; Nakaya, Naoki ; Fukao, Akira ; Fukudo, Shin ; Tsuji, Ichiro. / Personality and body mass index : A cross-sectional analysis from the Miyagi Cohort Study. In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research. 2008 ; Vol. 64, No. 1. pp. 71-80.
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Kakizaki, M, Kuriyama, S, Sato, Y, Shimazu, T, Matsuda-Ohmori, K, Nakaya, N, Fukao, A, Fukudo, S & Tsuji, I 2008, 'Personality and body mass index: A cross-sectional analysis from the Miyagi Cohort Study', Journal of Psychosomatic Research, vol. 64, no. 1, pp. 71-80. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2007.07.008

Personality and body mass index : A cross-sectional analysis from the Miyagi Cohort Study. / Kakizaki, Masako; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Sato, Yuki; Shimazu, Taichi; Matsuda-Ohmori, Kaori; Nakaya, Naoki; Fukao, Akira; Fukudo, Shin; Tsuji, Ichiro.

In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, Vol. 64, No. 1, 01.01.2008, p. 71-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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