Poor catch-up growth after proctocolectomy in pediatric patients with ulcerative colitis receiving prolonged steroid therapy

Keiichi Uchida, Toshimitsu Araki, Mikihiro Inoue, Kohei Otake, Shigeyuki Yoshiyama, Yuhki Koike, Kohei Matsushita, Yoshiki Okita, Chikao Miki, Masato Kusunoki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose The aim of the present study was to review the complications and growth after proctocolectomy and ileal J-pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA) in pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) patients receiving prolonged steroid therapy. Patients and methods We experienced 209 patients with UC who received IPAA between September 2000 and June 2009, and reviewed the medical records of 16 pediatric (<15 years of age at operation and >1 year follow-up) patients. Results The total dose of preoperative prednisolone (PSL) was 9,829 ± 9,283 mg (mean ± 1SD 880-30,000 mg). The dose of preoperative PSL was significantly related to the occurrence of preoperative major steroid-related complications (SRC). Older patients (>11 years at operation) grew more slowly compared with younger patients (≤11 years at operation) for 5 years. There was a significant difference in height between PSL high-dose (>10,000 mg) and PSL low-dose (≤10,000) patients for 5 years after colectomy. The mean height of PSL high-dose patients did not reach the standard level during the 5-year follow-up. Conclusion Preoperative prolonged high steroid therapy may disturb growth recovery of pediatric patients with UC, while early induction of colectomy allowed pediatric patients with PSL dependency to become free of steroids and get normal growth.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)373-377
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Surgery International
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 04-2010
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Surgery

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