Potential factors, including activities of daily living, influencing home discharge for patients with putaminal haemorrhage

Shinichiro Maeshima, Sayaka Okamoto, Hideto Okazaki, Shiho Mizuno, Naoki Asano, Hirofumi Maeda, Mitsuko Masaki, Hiroshi Matsuo, Tetsuya Tsunoda, Shigeru Sonoda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Convalescent rehabilitation wards assist stroke patients in acquiring skills for activities of daily living to increase the likelihood of home discharge. However, an improvement in activities of daily living does not necessarily imply that patients are discharged home. We investigated the characteristics of patients with putaminal haemorrhage who are discharged home following convalescence in rehabilitation wards. Methods: The sample comprised 89 patients (58 men and 31 women) with putaminal haemorrhage hospitalised in the convalescent rehabilitation ward of our hospital between August 2012 and July 2013. Their age ranged from 29 to 88 years (61.9 ± 11.9 years). The lesion occurred on the right side in 48 and on the left in 41 patients. The mean period from onset to hospitalisation in the convalescent rehabilitation ward was 30.8 ± 17.2 days, and the mean hospitalisation period was 70.7 ± 31.8 days. We examined age, sex, haematoma volume, duration from onset to hospitalisation, neurological symptoms, cognitive function, functional independence measure, number of cohabitating family members and whether the patient lived alone before stroke, and the relationship among these factors and discharge destination (home or facility/hospital) was assessed. Results: The discharge destination was home for 71 and a facility or hospital for 18 patients. Differences were observed in age, haematoma volume, neurological symptoms, cognitive function, functional independence measure score on admission and discharge, number of cohabitating family members and whether the patient lived alone before stroke for patients discharged home. Patients who required long-term care and were discharged home were more likely to be living with family members who were present during daytime. Home discharge was possible if functional independence measure score was ≥70 at the time of discharge for motor items and ≥24 for cognitive items, even if a patient lived alone before stroke. Conclusions: Although the presence of cohabitating family members was important, the factor most strongly influencing home discharge was the patient's activities of daily living status at the time of discharge. For patients who lived alone before stroke, physical and cognitive functions must be maintained for them to be discharged home after rehabilitation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number16
JournalBMC neurology
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-02-2016

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Putaminal Hemorrhage
Patient Discharge
Activities of Daily Living
Rehabilitation
Stroke
Cognition
Hospitalization
Hematoma
Long-Term Care

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Maeshima, Shinichiro ; Okamoto, Sayaka ; Okazaki, Hideto ; Mizuno, Shiho ; Asano, Naoki ; Maeda, Hirofumi ; Masaki, Mitsuko ; Matsuo, Hiroshi ; Tsunoda, Tetsuya ; Sonoda, Shigeru. / Potential factors, including activities of daily living, influencing home discharge for patients with putaminal haemorrhage. In: BMC neurology. 2016 ; Vol. 16, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background: Convalescent rehabilitation wards assist stroke patients in acquiring skills for activities of daily living to increase the likelihood of home discharge. However, an improvement in activities of daily living does not necessarily imply that patients are discharged home. We investigated the characteristics of patients with putaminal haemorrhage who are discharged home following convalescence in rehabilitation wards. Methods: The sample comprised 89 patients (58 men and 31 women) with putaminal haemorrhage hospitalised in the convalescent rehabilitation ward of our hospital between August 2012 and July 2013. Their age ranged from 29 to 88 years (61.9 ± 11.9 years). The lesion occurred on the right side in 48 and on the left in 41 patients. The mean period from onset to hospitalisation in the convalescent rehabilitation ward was 30.8 ± 17.2 days, and the mean hospitalisation period was 70.7 ± 31.8 days. We examined age, sex, haematoma volume, duration from onset to hospitalisation, neurological symptoms, cognitive function, functional independence measure, number of cohabitating family members and whether the patient lived alone before stroke, and the relationship among these factors and discharge destination (home or facility/hospital) was assessed. Results: The discharge destination was home for 71 and a facility or hospital for 18 patients. Differences were observed in age, haematoma volume, neurological symptoms, cognitive function, functional independence measure score on admission and discharge, number of cohabitating family members and whether the patient lived alone before stroke for patients discharged home. Patients who required long-term care and were discharged home were more likely to be living with family members who were present during daytime. Home discharge was possible if functional independence measure score was ≥70 at the time of discharge for motor items and ≥24 for cognitive items, even if a patient lived alone before stroke. Conclusions: Although the presence of cohabitating family members was important, the factor most strongly influencing home discharge was the patient's activities of daily living status at the time of discharge. For patients who lived alone before stroke, physical and cognitive functions must be maintained for them to be discharged home after rehabilitation.",
author = "Shinichiro Maeshima and Sayaka Okamoto and Hideto Okazaki and Shiho Mizuno and Naoki Asano and Hirofumi Maeda and Mitsuko Masaki and Hiroshi Matsuo and Tetsuya Tsunoda and Shigeru Sonoda",
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Potential factors, including activities of daily living, influencing home discharge for patients with putaminal haemorrhage. / Maeshima, Shinichiro; Okamoto, Sayaka; Okazaki, Hideto; Mizuno, Shiho; Asano, Naoki; Maeda, Hirofumi; Masaki, Mitsuko; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Tsunoda, Tetsuya; Sonoda, Shigeru.

In: BMC neurology, Vol. 16, No. 1, 16, 01.02.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Potential factors, including activities of daily living, influencing home discharge for patients with putaminal haemorrhage

AU - Maeshima, Shinichiro

AU - Okamoto, Sayaka

AU - Okazaki, Hideto

AU - Mizuno, Shiho

AU - Asano, Naoki

AU - Maeda, Hirofumi

AU - Masaki, Mitsuko

AU - Matsuo, Hiroshi

AU - Tsunoda, Tetsuya

AU - Sonoda, Shigeru

PY - 2016/2/1

Y1 - 2016/2/1

N2 - Background: Convalescent rehabilitation wards assist stroke patients in acquiring skills for activities of daily living to increase the likelihood of home discharge. However, an improvement in activities of daily living does not necessarily imply that patients are discharged home. We investigated the characteristics of patients with putaminal haemorrhage who are discharged home following convalescence in rehabilitation wards. Methods: The sample comprised 89 patients (58 men and 31 women) with putaminal haemorrhage hospitalised in the convalescent rehabilitation ward of our hospital between August 2012 and July 2013. Their age ranged from 29 to 88 years (61.9 ± 11.9 years). The lesion occurred on the right side in 48 and on the left in 41 patients. The mean period from onset to hospitalisation in the convalescent rehabilitation ward was 30.8 ± 17.2 days, and the mean hospitalisation period was 70.7 ± 31.8 days. We examined age, sex, haematoma volume, duration from onset to hospitalisation, neurological symptoms, cognitive function, functional independence measure, number of cohabitating family members and whether the patient lived alone before stroke, and the relationship among these factors and discharge destination (home or facility/hospital) was assessed. Results: The discharge destination was home for 71 and a facility or hospital for 18 patients. Differences were observed in age, haematoma volume, neurological symptoms, cognitive function, functional independence measure score on admission and discharge, number of cohabitating family members and whether the patient lived alone before stroke for patients discharged home. Patients who required long-term care and were discharged home were more likely to be living with family members who were present during daytime. Home discharge was possible if functional independence measure score was ≥70 at the time of discharge for motor items and ≥24 for cognitive items, even if a patient lived alone before stroke. Conclusions: Although the presence of cohabitating family members was important, the factor most strongly influencing home discharge was the patient's activities of daily living status at the time of discharge. For patients who lived alone before stroke, physical and cognitive functions must be maintained for them to be discharged home after rehabilitation.

AB - Background: Convalescent rehabilitation wards assist stroke patients in acquiring skills for activities of daily living to increase the likelihood of home discharge. However, an improvement in activities of daily living does not necessarily imply that patients are discharged home. We investigated the characteristics of patients with putaminal haemorrhage who are discharged home following convalescence in rehabilitation wards. Methods: The sample comprised 89 patients (58 men and 31 women) with putaminal haemorrhage hospitalised in the convalescent rehabilitation ward of our hospital between August 2012 and July 2013. Their age ranged from 29 to 88 years (61.9 ± 11.9 years). The lesion occurred on the right side in 48 and on the left in 41 patients. The mean period from onset to hospitalisation in the convalescent rehabilitation ward was 30.8 ± 17.2 days, and the mean hospitalisation period was 70.7 ± 31.8 days. We examined age, sex, haematoma volume, duration from onset to hospitalisation, neurological symptoms, cognitive function, functional independence measure, number of cohabitating family members and whether the patient lived alone before stroke, and the relationship among these factors and discharge destination (home or facility/hospital) was assessed. Results: The discharge destination was home for 71 and a facility or hospital for 18 patients. Differences were observed in age, haematoma volume, neurological symptoms, cognitive function, functional independence measure score on admission and discharge, number of cohabitating family members and whether the patient lived alone before stroke for patients discharged home. Patients who required long-term care and were discharged home were more likely to be living with family members who were present during daytime. Home discharge was possible if functional independence measure score was ≥70 at the time of discharge for motor items and ≥24 for cognitive items, even if a patient lived alone before stroke. Conclusions: Although the presence of cohabitating family members was important, the factor most strongly influencing home discharge was the patient's activities of daily living status at the time of discharge. For patients who lived alone before stroke, physical and cognitive functions must be maintained for them to be discharged home after rehabilitation.

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