Potential usefulness of DNA methylation as a risk marker for digestive cancer associated with inflammation

Tomomitsu Tahara, Tomiyasu Arisawa

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

DNA methylation has been deeply involved in the development and progression of digestive cancer, while aberrant DNA methylation has also often been observed in aged and inflammatory digestive tissues. Helicobacter pylori-related chronic gastritis, ulcerative colitis, and hepatitis B virus- and hepatitis C virus-related chronic hepatitis, are significant risk factors for developing cancer. A number of studies have revealed the specific methylation patterns for specific tissue types. DNA methylation status is stably transmitted to daughter cells. Also, unlike genetic mutations, it is possible to detect very tiny amounts of methylated DNA among tissues. Therefore, the use of aberrant methylation as a marker could be applicable to risk estimation of cancer development. We discuss the potential usefulness of DNA methylation as a risk marker for inflammation-associated digestive cancer, especially with attempts on gastric cancer, ulcerative colitis-associated cancer, and hepatitis B virus- and hepatitis C virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)489-497
Number of pages9
JournalExpert Review of Molecular Diagnostics
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-06-2012

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DNA Methylation
Inflammation
Neoplasms
Ulcerative Colitis
Hepatitis B virus
Hepacivirus
Methylation
Gastritis
Chronic Hepatitis
Helicobacter pylori
Stomach Neoplasms
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Mutation
DNA

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

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Potential usefulness of DNA methylation as a risk marker for digestive cancer associated with inflammation. / Tahara, Tomomitsu; Arisawa, Tomiyasu.

In: Expert Review of Molecular Diagnostics, Vol. 12, No. 5, 01.06.2012, p. 489-497.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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