Predicting factor of quality of life in long-term jaundice-free survivors after the Kasai operation

Keiichi Uchida, Hisashi Urata, Hiroshi Suzuki, Mikihiro Inoue, Naomi Konishi, Toshimitsu Araki, Chikao Miki, Masato Kusunoki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Purpose The aim of this study was to determine simple predictors for quality of life (QOL) in long-term jaundice-free survivors after the Kasai operation. Methods Kasai's original portoenterostomy was performed on 55 patients with biliary atresia. Among them, records were reviewed retrospectively of 35 long-term (at least 5 years) and jaundice-free (clearance in bilirubin level less than 1.0 mg/dL after Kasai operation) survivors. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on QOL, and the differences in clinical and laboratory data were analyzed statistically. Results The ages at Kasai operation, histologic, fibrosis grade of liver biopsy specimen at operation, the first onset and frequency of postoperative cholangitis, and postoperative clearance speed of jaundice after Kasai operation were not significantly different between the 2 groups. The aspartate aminotransferase (AST) level at 1 year was significantly correlated with the serum concentration of hyaluronic acid and an independent predictor for QOL in long-term jaundice-free survivors of the Kasai operation. Conclusions The serum AST level at 1 year was a simple, strong predicting factor of QOL and liver dysfunction in long-term jaundice-free survivors after Kasai operation and may prove useful in planning liver transplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1040-1044
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume39
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 07-2004
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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