Predominance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus SCCmec type II-CC5 and SCCmec type IV-CC1/CC8 among companion animal clinical isolates in Japan: Findings from phylogenetic comparison with human clinical isolates

Yui Taniguchi, Shota Koide, Yoshihiko Maeyama, Kiyoko Tamai, Wataru Hayashi, Hayato Tanaka, Masaki Iimura, Masahiro Suzuki, Yukiko Nagano, Yoshichika Arakawa, Noriyuki Nagano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To characterise the genotypic profiles of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clinical isolates from companion animals and to investigate their association with those from humans in Japan. Methods: Non-duplicated MRSA clinical isolates recovered between July 2016 and January 2018 were analysed. The MRSA isolates were typed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based open reading frame (ORF) typing (POT) scores, SCCmec types, multilocus sequence typing, and virulence gene profiles. Phylogenetic comparison of those isolates with previously described human isolates was performed. Results: Among 56 MRSA isolates (33 cats, 20 dogs and three rabbits), 26 isolates with a POT1 score of 93, SCCmec type II mostly belonged to CC5, including ST5. Twenty-six isolates with a POT1 score of 106, SCCmec type IV showed diversity of STs: 15 isolates belonged to CC8, mainly including ST8, and 11 isolates belonged to CC1, including ST1 and newly identified STs 4768, 4775, and 4779. Two cat isolates were ST8-SCCmec type IV possessing pvl/ACME-arcA, presumed to be the hypervirulent community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) clone USA300. Notably, all three rabbit isolates belonged to ST4768. The POT1 score 106 CA-MRSA isolates from animals and humans were divided into two large clusters of CC1 and CC8, where host species-specific sub-clusters were not identified within each cluster. A large cluster of POT1 score 93 healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) isolates from animals and humans consisted of sub-clusters formed exclusively by the vast majority of human isolates and those formed by animal and human isolates. Conclusion: Companion animals could be potential reservoirs and vehicles for the transmission of CA-MRSA to humans, and could transmit companion animal-adaptive HA-MRSA lineages to humans as their second reservoirs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)253-259
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance
Volume20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 03-2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Microbiology (medical)

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