Preoperative lower body mass index correlates with poorer prognosis in patients undergoing curative laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer

Ryo Uratani, Yuji Toiyama, Tadanobu Shimura, Koichiro Mori, Hiroyuki Fujikawa, Jyunichiro Hiro, Masaki Ohi, Yasuhiro Inoue, Koji Tanaka, Toshimitsu Araki, Yasuhiko Mohri, Masato Kusunoki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the correlations between clinicopathological findings, laboratory data and survival outcome in patients undergoing curative laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients and Methods: Clinicopathological findings and laboratory data, including tumor markers carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) and systemic inflammatory response indicators, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and modified Glasgow prognosis score (mGPS), for 204 patients (tumor stage I-III) undergoing laparoscopic curative surgery for CRC were collected. Results: Elevated CA19-9 and mGPS, and body mass index (BMI) <20 kg/m2 were significant indicators of poorer overall survival, while CA19-9 and BMI were validated as independent predictors of overall survival. In addition, BMI <20 kg/m2 was a significant independent factor predictive of poorer diseasefree survival. BMI significantly negatively correlated with NLR, which reflects the patients' immune response. Conclusion: Lower BMI is a promising predictor of recurrence and poor prognosis in patients treated by laparoscopic surgery for CRC with curative intent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5639-5648
Number of pages10
JournalAnticancer research
Volume35
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - 01-10-2015
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Preoperative lower body mass index correlates with poorer prognosis in patients undergoing curative laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this