Prevalence, severity, and risk factors of cancer-related fatigue among working cancer survivors: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Masaaki Matsunaga, Yupeng He, May Thet Khine, Xuliang Shi, Ryusei Okegawa, Yuanying Li, Hiroshi Yatsuya, Atsuhiko Ota

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence, severity, and risk factors of cancer-related fatigue among currently working cancer survivors. Methods: We searched the PubMed, Embase, Scopus, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and ICHUSHI databases. The risk of bias was evaluated independently using the Risk of Bias Assessment Tool for Non-randomized Studies (RoBANS). A meta-analysis was conducted to determine the prevalence, severity, and related factors associated with cancer-related fatigue among currently working cancer survivors. Results: Our meta-analysis included 18 studies and revealed that 42.2% of currently working cancer survivors experience cancer-related fatigue. The fatigue severity in this group was significantly higher than that in workers without cancer (absolute standardized mean difference (SMD) = 0.67), but lower than that in cancer survivors who had previously worked and were not currently working (absolute SMD = 0.72). Distress was identified as a potential risk factor for cancer-related fatigue in working cancer survivors (partial correlation coefficient = 0.38). Conclusions: The high prevalence of cancer-related fatigue among employed cancer survivors underscores the need for targeted workplace interventions and fatigue management strategies. While the severity of fatigue is less than that seen in non-working survivors, the comparison with the general working population highlights a significant health disparity. The association between distress and fatigue suggests the necessity for a holistic approach to fatigue management that considers both physical and mental factors in working cancer survivors. Implications for Cancer Survivors: Our findings highlight the critical need for healthcare professionals and employers to monitor fatigue levels among working cancer survivors and offer appropriate support.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Cancer Survivorship
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2024

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)

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