Preventive effects of risedronate and calcitriol on cancellous osteopenia in rats treated with high-dose glucocorticoid

Jun Iwamoto, Azusa Seki, Tsuyoshi Takeda, Yoshihiro Sato, Harumoto Yamada, Chwan Li Shen, James K. Yeh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We compared the effects of risedronate (Ris) and calcitriol (Cal) on cancellous osteopenia in rats treated with high-dose glucocorticoid (GC). Forty female Sprague-Dawley rats, 4 months of age, were randomized by the stratified weight method into four groups of 10 rats each according to the following treatment schedule: intact control, and GC administration with vehicle, Ris, or Cal. The GC (methylprednisolone sodium succinate, 5.0 mg/kg, s.c.), Ris.(10 μg/kg, s.c.), and Cal (0.1 μg/kg, p.o.) were administered 3 times a week. At the end of the 4-week treatment period, bone histomorphometric analysis was performed for cancellous bone of the proximal tibial metaphysis. The GC administration decreased cancellous bone volume (BV/total tissue volume [TV]), trabecular number (Tb N), and trabecuiar thickness (Tb Th), as a result of increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation. Ris treatment markedly increased cancellous BV/TV and Tb N above the control level as a result of suppressed bone turnover. On the other hand, Cal treatment attenuated the GC-induced decrease in cancellous BV/TV and Tb Th as a result of suppressed bone resorption and maintained bone formation. This study showed the differential effects of Ris and Cal on cancellous osteopenia in rats treated with high-dose GC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)349-355
Number of pages7
JournalExperimental Animals
Volume55
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-08-2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • veterinary(all)

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