[Progress in management of severe tuberculosis or tuberculosis with severe complication].

Hiroshi Kimura, Kazuyoshi Imaizumi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The management and therapy of miliary tuberculosis: Nobuharu OHSHIMA (Asthma and Allergy Center, National Hospital Organization Tokyo National Hospital). Treatment and management of severe pulmonary tuberculosis: Yuta HAYASHI, Kenji OGAWA (Department of Respiratory Medicine, National Hospital Organization Higashi Nagoya National Hospital). Death of a young (non-elderly) patient may become a large psychological burden not only for patient's family but also for medical staff. We analyzed non-elderly cases with severe pulmonary tuberculosis by comparing 13 patients who died of tuberculosis in the hospital (death group) and 31 patients who survived and were discharged from hospital (survivor group). The mean age was older and there were more patients who were out of employment in the death group compared to the survivor group. Among the factors related to the general condition evaluated on the admission, disturbance of consciousness, respiratory insufficiency, impairment in the ADL, poor dietary intake, and decubitus ulcer were more observed in the death group. Chest X-ray finding was not a predictive factor of poor prognosis. Among the laboratory findings, the numbers of peripheral blood lymphocytes, red blood cells, and thrombocytes significantly decreased in the death group. Serum level of total cholesterol, cholinesterase, and albumin were also significantly lower in the death group, indicating that malnutrition was related to the death of severe tuberculosis. Further studies are needed to establish the optimal nutritional management and evaluate the effectiveness of adjunctive use of steroid for severe tuberculosis patients. Invasive fungal infection complicated with pulmonary tuberculosis: Akira WATANABE, Katsuhiko KAMEI (Division of Clinical Research, Medical Mycology Research Center, Chiba University). Among the invasive mycoses, chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) is the most frequent disease as a sequel to pulmonary tuberculosis. However, identifying CPA early in patient with persistent pulmonary shadows from pulmonary tuberculosis is difficult. Serum microbiological tests such as Aspergillus precipitans (principally for Aspergillus IgG antibodies) are useful but sensitivity and specificity of this test are not high. Even treated, CPA has a case mortality rate of 50% over a span of 5 years. Morbidity is marked by both systemic and respiratory symptom and hemoptysis. Loss of lung function and life-threatening hemoptysis are common. As invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, early diagnosis and treatment of CPA might improve the outcome. Regarding the treatment, concomitant use of some anti-tubercular agents and antifungals is contradicted. Treatment and management for pulmonary tuberculosis complicated with COPD and interstitial pneumonia: Shinji TAMAKI, Takashi KUGE, Midori TAMURA, Sayuri TANAKA, Eiko YOSHINO, Mouka TAMURA (National Hospital Organization Nara Medical Center), Hiroshi KIMURA (Second Department of Internal Medicine and Respiratory Medicine, Nara Medical University) Recently, patients of pulmonary tuberculosis have many complications especially in the elderly population. It is recognized that patients with COPD and interstitial pneumonia (IP) have an increased risk for developing active tuberculosis. The aim of this report is to describe the clinical findings of pulmonary tuberculosis complicated with COPD and IP. We reviewed 327 patients who were diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis. Twenty-six cases were complicated with COPD. All patients were male, and had smoking history. Cavitary lesions were observed only in 5 cases. Acute exacerbation of COPD occurred in one fatal case. Ten cases were complicated with IP. Cavitary lesions were observed in 3 cases. Acute exacerbation of IP were observed in 7 cases, and 4 patients died during the anti-tuberculosis treatment. Careful evaluation and treatment are necessary for tuberculosis patients complicated with COPD and IP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)571-582
Number of pages12
JournalKekkaku : [Tuberculosis]
Volume89
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 05-2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Infectious Diseases

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