Psychological attitudes and risk of breast cancer in Japan

A prospective study

Kenji Wakai, Masayo Kojima, Kazuko Nishio, Sadao Suzuki, Yoshimitsu Niwa, Yingsong Lin, Takaaki Kondo, Hiroshi Yatsuya, Koji Tamakoshi, Akio Yamamoto, Shinkan Tokudome, Hideaki Toyoshima, Akiko Tamakoshi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the association between psychological factors and the risk of breast cancer prospectively in a non-Western population. Methods: Data from the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) study were analyzed. From 1988 to 1990, 34,497 women aged 40-79 years completed a questionnaire on medical, lifestyle and psychosocial factors. The rate ratios (RRs) of their responses were computed by fitting to proportional hazards models. Results: During the mean follow-up period of 7.5 years, 149 breast cancer cases were documented. Those individuals who possessed "ikigai" (Japanese term meaning something that made one's life worth living) showed a significantly lower risk of breast cancer (multivariate-adjusted RR = 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.47-0.94). Those who perceived themselves as able to make decisions quickly also had a lower risk of breast cancer (multivariate-adjusted RR = 0.56; 95% CI = 0.36-0.87). The other factors investigated, including ease of anger arousal and self-perceived stress of daily life were not associated with breast cancer risk. Conclusions: Although further studies will be necessary to verify these findings, our results suggest that having "ikigai" and being decisive decrease an individual's subsequent risk of breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-267
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Causes and Control
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-04-2007
Externally publishedYes

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Japan
Prospective Studies
Breast Neoplasms
Psychology
Confidence Intervals
Anger
Arousal
Psychological Stress
Proportional Hazards Models
Life Style
Cohort Studies
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Wakai, K., Kojima, M., Nishio, K., Suzuki, S., Niwa, Y., Lin, Y., ... Tamakoshi, A. (2007). Psychological attitudes and risk of breast cancer in Japan: A prospective study. Cancer Causes and Control, 18(3), 259-267. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-006-0111-x
Wakai, Kenji ; Kojima, Masayo ; Nishio, Kazuko ; Suzuki, Sadao ; Niwa, Yoshimitsu ; Lin, Yingsong ; Kondo, Takaaki ; Yatsuya, Hiroshi ; Tamakoshi, Koji ; Yamamoto, Akio ; Tokudome, Shinkan ; Toyoshima, Hideaki ; Tamakoshi, Akiko. / Psychological attitudes and risk of breast cancer in Japan : A prospective study. In: Cancer Causes and Control. 2007 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 259-267.
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Wakai, K, Kojima, M, Nishio, K, Suzuki, S, Niwa, Y, Lin, Y, Kondo, T, Yatsuya, H, Tamakoshi, K, Yamamoto, A, Tokudome, S, Toyoshima, H & Tamakoshi, A 2007, 'Psychological attitudes and risk of breast cancer in Japan: A prospective study', Cancer Causes and Control, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 259-267. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-006-0111-x

Psychological attitudes and risk of breast cancer in Japan : A prospective study. / Wakai, Kenji; Kojima, Masayo; Nishio, Kazuko; Suzuki, Sadao; Niwa, Yoshimitsu; Lin, Yingsong; Kondo, Takaaki; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Tamakoshi, Koji; Yamamoto, Akio; Tokudome, Shinkan; Toyoshima, Hideaki; Tamakoshi, Akiko.

In: Cancer Causes and Control, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.04.2007, p. 259-267.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Psychological attitudes and risk of breast cancer in Japan

T2 - A prospective study

AU - Wakai, Kenji

AU - Kojima, Masayo

AU - Nishio, Kazuko

AU - Suzuki, Sadao

AU - Niwa, Yoshimitsu

AU - Lin, Yingsong

AU - Kondo, Takaaki

AU - Yatsuya, Hiroshi

AU - Tamakoshi, Koji

AU - Yamamoto, Akio

AU - Tokudome, Shinkan

AU - Toyoshima, Hideaki

AU - Tamakoshi, Akiko

PY - 2007/4/1

Y1 - 2007/4/1

N2 - Objective: To examine the association between psychological factors and the risk of breast cancer prospectively in a non-Western population. Methods: Data from the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) study were analyzed. From 1988 to 1990, 34,497 women aged 40-79 years completed a questionnaire on medical, lifestyle and psychosocial factors. The rate ratios (RRs) of their responses were computed by fitting to proportional hazards models. Results: During the mean follow-up period of 7.5 years, 149 breast cancer cases were documented. Those individuals who possessed "ikigai" (Japanese term meaning something that made one's life worth living) showed a significantly lower risk of breast cancer (multivariate-adjusted RR = 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.47-0.94). Those who perceived themselves as able to make decisions quickly also had a lower risk of breast cancer (multivariate-adjusted RR = 0.56; 95% CI = 0.36-0.87). The other factors investigated, including ease of anger arousal and self-perceived stress of daily life were not associated with breast cancer risk. Conclusions: Although further studies will be necessary to verify these findings, our results suggest that having "ikigai" and being decisive decrease an individual's subsequent risk of breast cancer.

AB - Objective: To examine the association between psychological factors and the risk of breast cancer prospectively in a non-Western population. Methods: Data from the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) study were analyzed. From 1988 to 1990, 34,497 women aged 40-79 years completed a questionnaire on medical, lifestyle and psychosocial factors. The rate ratios (RRs) of their responses were computed by fitting to proportional hazards models. Results: During the mean follow-up period of 7.5 years, 149 breast cancer cases were documented. Those individuals who possessed "ikigai" (Japanese term meaning something that made one's life worth living) showed a significantly lower risk of breast cancer (multivariate-adjusted RR = 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.47-0.94). Those who perceived themselves as able to make decisions quickly also had a lower risk of breast cancer (multivariate-adjusted RR = 0.56; 95% CI = 0.36-0.87). The other factors investigated, including ease of anger arousal and self-perceived stress of daily life were not associated with breast cancer risk. Conclusions: Although further studies will be necessary to verify these findings, our results suggest that having "ikigai" and being decisive decrease an individual's subsequent risk of breast cancer.

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