Reliability of stiffness measurement device during passive isokinetic spastic wrist movements of healthy subjects and hemiplegics

Abbas Orand, Hiroyuki Miyasaka, Kotaro Takeda, Genichi Tanino, Takeshi Chihara, Hidehiko Beppu, Shigeru Sonoda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The consistency of torque measurements during repetitive moving arm movements and also during passive wrist movements at two angular velocities of slow (∼6°/s) and moderate (∼120°/s) was investigated. The designed and developed device was applied to 3 cases, to a spring, to 8 able-bodied subjects and to 2 hemiplegic patients. While the mean of the intra-class correlation coefficient of subjects were 0.65 and 0.75 for slow and moderate angular velocities, those of the hemiplegic patients and the spring respectively ranged between excellent values of 0.93–1 and 0.91–1. The Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients of the 3 cases for the 2 slow and moderate angular velocities ranged between 0.80 and 1. We could verify that the device can be used in our future researches and it can (1) reliably rotate a moving arm horizontally with angular velocities between 3 and 350°/s constantly in a range of motion between −60 and 60° and (2) simultaneously capture the data of angular displacement, torque, and two electromyogram activities. For the standardization of our future studies with the device, we could verify the stability of the last two repeated passive wrist movements in case of patients. The results of the study with the able-bodied subjects are also important as a reference for our studies with the hemiplegic.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)114-123
Number of pages10
JournalBiocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomedical Engineering

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