Remote follow-up by pharmacists for blood pressure control in patients with hypertension: a systematic review and a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Noriaki Matsumoto, Tsuyoshi Nakai, Mikio Sakakibara, Yukinori Aimiya, Shinya Sugiura, Jeannie K. Lee, Shigeki Yamada, Tomohiro Mizuno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Hypertension is a major cause of cardiovascular diseases. Several recent studies reported that pharmacists’ remote follow-up reduced hypertension patients’ blood pressure (BP). This meta-analysis aims to verify whether remote follow-up by pharmacists improves BP levels and reveal the factors that make the intervention effective. The search, conducted using PubMed/Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library from June to July 2023, targeted articles published between October 1982 and June 2023, using terms including “pharmacist”, “hypertension”, and “randomized controlled trial (RCT)”. The inclusion criteria were: (a) RCTs involving hypertension patients with or without comorbidities, (b) pharmacists using remote communication tools to conduct follow-up encounter during the intervention period, (c) reporting systolic blood pressure (SBP) at baseline and during intervention. SBP was the primary outcome for the meta-analysis. Thirteen studies (3969 participants) were included in this meta-analysis. The mean difference of SBP between intervention group and control group was − 7.35 mmHg (P < 0.0001). Subgroup analyses showed the greater reduction of SBP in the “regularly scheduled follow-up cohort” (− 8.89 mmHg) compared with the “as needed follow-up cohort” (− 3.23 mmHg, P < 0.0001). The results revealed that remote follow-up by pharmacists reduced SBP levels in hypertension patients and scheduled remote follow-up may contribute to the effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2535
JournalScientific reports
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12-2024

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

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