Risk of progression from mild memory impairment to clinically diagnosable Alzheimer's disease in a Japanese community (from the Nakayama Study)

Naomi Sonobe, Ryuji Hata, Tomohisa Ishikawa, Kantaro Sonobe, Teruhisa Matsumoto, Yasutaka Toyota, Takaaki Mori, Ryuji Fukuhara, Kenjiro Komori, Shu Ichi Ueno, Satoshi Tanimukai, Manabu Ikeda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Memory impairment has been proposed as the most common early sign of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aims of this work were to evaluate the risk of progression from mild memory impairment/no dementia (MMI/ND) to clinically diagnosable AD in a community-based prospective cohort and to establish the risk factors for progression from MMI/ND to AD in the elderly. Methods: Elderly subjects aged over 65 years were selected from the participants in the first Nakayama study. MMI/ND was defined as memory deficit on objective memory assessment, without dementia, impairment of general cognitive function, or disability in activities of daily living. A total of 104 MMI/ND subjects selected from 1242 community-dwellers were followed longitudinally for five years. Results: During the five-year follow-up, 11 (10.6%) subjects were diagnosed with AD, five (4.8%) with vascular dementia (VaD), and six (5.8%) with dementia of other etiology. Logistic regression analysis revealed that diabetes mellitus (DM) and a family history of dementia (within third-degree relatives) were positively associated with progression to AD, while no factor was significantly associated with progression to VaD or all types of dementia. Conclusions: DM and a family history of dementia were significant risk factors for progression from MMI/ND to clinically diagnosable AD in the elderly in a Japanese community.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)772-779
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Psychogeriatrics
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-06-2011

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Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Vascular Dementia
Diabetes Mellitus
Memory Disorders
Activities of Daily Living
Cognition
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Sonobe, Naomi ; Hata, Ryuji ; Ishikawa, Tomohisa ; Sonobe, Kantaro ; Matsumoto, Teruhisa ; Toyota, Yasutaka ; Mori, Takaaki ; Fukuhara, Ryuji ; Komori, Kenjiro ; Ueno, Shu Ichi ; Tanimukai, Satoshi ; Ikeda, Manabu. / Risk of progression from mild memory impairment to clinically diagnosable Alzheimer's disease in a Japanese community (from the Nakayama Study). In: International Psychogeriatrics. 2011 ; Vol. 23, No. 5. pp. 772-779.
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abstract = "Background: Memory impairment has been proposed as the most common early sign of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aims of this work were to evaluate the risk of progression from mild memory impairment/no dementia (MMI/ND) to clinically diagnosable AD in a community-based prospective cohort and to establish the risk factors for progression from MMI/ND to AD in the elderly. Methods: Elderly subjects aged over 65 years were selected from the participants in the first Nakayama study. MMI/ND was defined as memory deficit on objective memory assessment, without dementia, impairment of general cognitive function, or disability in activities of daily living. A total of 104 MMI/ND subjects selected from 1242 community-dwellers were followed longitudinally for five years. Results: During the five-year follow-up, 11 (10.6{\%}) subjects were diagnosed with AD, five (4.8{\%}) with vascular dementia (VaD), and six (5.8{\%}) with dementia of other etiology. Logistic regression analysis revealed that diabetes mellitus (DM) and a family history of dementia (within third-degree relatives) were positively associated with progression to AD, while no factor was significantly associated with progression to VaD or all types of dementia. Conclusions: DM and a family history of dementia were significant risk factors for progression from MMI/ND to clinically diagnosable AD in the elderly in a Japanese community.",
author = "Naomi Sonobe and Ryuji Hata and Tomohisa Ishikawa and Kantaro Sonobe and Teruhisa Matsumoto and Yasutaka Toyota and Takaaki Mori and Ryuji Fukuhara and Kenjiro Komori and Ueno, {Shu Ichi} and Satoshi Tanimukai and Manabu Ikeda",
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Sonobe, N, Hata, R, Ishikawa, T, Sonobe, K, Matsumoto, T, Toyota, Y, Mori, T, Fukuhara, R, Komori, K, Ueno, SI, Tanimukai, S & Ikeda, M 2011, 'Risk of progression from mild memory impairment to clinically diagnosable Alzheimer's disease in a Japanese community (from the Nakayama Study)', International Psychogeriatrics, vol. 23, no. 5, pp. 772-779. https://doi.org/10.1017/S104161021000222X

Risk of progression from mild memory impairment to clinically diagnosable Alzheimer's disease in a Japanese community (from the Nakayama Study). / Sonobe, Naomi; Hata, Ryuji; Ishikawa, Tomohisa; Sonobe, Kantaro; Matsumoto, Teruhisa; Toyota, Yasutaka; Mori, Takaaki; Fukuhara, Ryuji; Komori, Kenjiro; Ueno, Shu Ichi; Tanimukai, Satoshi; Ikeda, Manabu.

In: International Psychogeriatrics, Vol. 23, No. 5, 01.06.2011, p. 772-779.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Risk of progression from mild memory impairment to clinically diagnosable Alzheimer's disease in a Japanese community (from the Nakayama Study)

AU - Sonobe, Naomi

AU - Hata, Ryuji

AU - Ishikawa, Tomohisa

AU - Sonobe, Kantaro

AU - Matsumoto, Teruhisa

AU - Toyota, Yasutaka

AU - Mori, Takaaki

AU - Fukuhara, Ryuji

AU - Komori, Kenjiro

AU - Ueno, Shu Ichi

AU - Tanimukai, Satoshi

AU - Ikeda, Manabu

PY - 2011/6/1

Y1 - 2011/6/1

N2 - Background: Memory impairment has been proposed as the most common early sign of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aims of this work were to evaluate the risk of progression from mild memory impairment/no dementia (MMI/ND) to clinically diagnosable AD in a community-based prospective cohort and to establish the risk factors for progression from MMI/ND to AD in the elderly. Methods: Elderly subjects aged over 65 years were selected from the participants in the first Nakayama study. MMI/ND was defined as memory deficit on objective memory assessment, without dementia, impairment of general cognitive function, or disability in activities of daily living. A total of 104 MMI/ND subjects selected from 1242 community-dwellers were followed longitudinally for five years. Results: During the five-year follow-up, 11 (10.6%) subjects were diagnosed with AD, five (4.8%) with vascular dementia (VaD), and six (5.8%) with dementia of other etiology. Logistic regression analysis revealed that diabetes mellitus (DM) and a family history of dementia (within third-degree relatives) were positively associated with progression to AD, while no factor was significantly associated with progression to VaD or all types of dementia. Conclusions: DM and a family history of dementia were significant risk factors for progression from MMI/ND to clinically diagnosable AD in the elderly in a Japanese community.

AB - Background: Memory impairment has been proposed as the most common early sign of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aims of this work were to evaluate the risk of progression from mild memory impairment/no dementia (MMI/ND) to clinically diagnosable AD in a community-based prospective cohort and to establish the risk factors for progression from MMI/ND to AD in the elderly. Methods: Elderly subjects aged over 65 years were selected from the participants in the first Nakayama study. MMI/ND was defined as memory deficit on objective memory assessment, without dementia, impairment of general cognitive function, or disability in activities of daily living. A total of 104 MMI/ND subjects selected from 1242 community-dwellers were followed longitudinally for five years. Results: During the five-year follow-up, 11 (10.6%) subjects were diagnosed with AD, five (4.8%) with vascular dementia (VaD), and six (5.8%) with dementia of other etiology. Logistic regression analysis revealed that diabetes mellitus (DM) and a family history of dementia (within third-degree relatives) were positively associated with progression to AD, while no factor was significantly associated with progression to VaD or all types of dementia. Conclusions: DM and a family history of dementia were significant risk factors for progression from MMI/ND to clinically diagnosable AD in the elderly in a Japanese community.

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