Serum uric acid and mortality form cardiovascular disease: EPOCH-JAPAN study

EPOCH-JAPAN GROUP

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To investigate the relationship between serum uric acid levels and cardiovascular disease in Asians. Methods: We examined the above relationship using the data of Evidence for Cardiovascular Prevention from Observational Cohorts in Japan (EPOCH-JAPAN Study). The data of 36,313 subjects (15,628 men and 20,685 women aged 35 –89 years without histories of stroke, coronary heart disease, or cancer at baseline) were used for the analyses. Sex-specific hazard ratios (HRs) of mortality from cardiovascular disease were estimated according to the quintiles of serum uric acid using Cox hazard models stratified by cohorts. Results: During 441,771 person-years of follow-up, we documented 1,288 cardiovascular deaths. A J-or U-shaped relationship between serum uric acid level and cardiovascular disease mortality was observed. Compared with the lowest quintile of serum uric acid levels, the highest quintile was associated with an increased cardiovascular disease mortality in men [HR: 1.28; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01– 1.63] and women (HR: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.14–1.99). However, there was no significant association with mortality from stroke, coronary heart disease or heart failure in both men and women. Conclusion: This large pooled analysis in Japan suggested a J-or U-shaped relationship between serum uric acid levels and cardiovascular mortality. The highest quintile of serum uric acid levels was associated with increased cardiovascular disease mortality in both Japanese men and women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)692-703
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of atherosclerosis and thrombosis
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2016

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Uric Acid
Cardiovascular Diseases
Mortality
Serum
Hazards
Proportional Hazards Models
Coronary Disease
Japan
Stroke
Confidence Intervals
Heart Neoplasms
Heart Failure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

@article{e58ec2aa9c894b3b8312f6c242aa3637,
title = "Serum uric acid and mortality form cardiovascular disease: EPOCH-JAPAN study",
abstract = "Aim: To investigate the relationship between serum uric acid levels and cardiovascular disease in Asians. Methods: We examined the above relationship using the data of Evidence for Cardiovascular Prevention from Observational Cohorts in Japan (EPOCH-JAPAN Study). The data of 36,313 subjects (15,628 men and 20,685 women aged 35 –89 years without histories of stroke, coronary heart disease, or cancer at baseline) were used for the analyses. Sex-specific hazard ratios (HRs) of mortality from cardiovascular disease were estimated according to the quintiles of serum uric acid using Cox hazard models stratified by cohorts. Results: During 441,771 person-years of follow-up, we documented 1,288 cardiovascular deaths. A J-or U-shaped relationship between serum uric acid level and cardiovascular disease mortality was observed. Compared with the lowest quintile of serum uric acid levels, the highest quintile was associated with an increased cardiovascular disease mortality in men [HR: 1.28; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 1.01– 1.63] and women (HR: 1.51; 95{\%} CI: 1.14–1.99). However, there was no significant association with mortality from stroke, coronary heart disease or heart failure in both men and women. Conclusion: This large pooled analysis in Japan suggested a J-or U-shaped relationship between serum uric acid levels and cardiovascular mortality. The highest quintile of serum uric acid levels was associated with increased cardiovascular disease mortality in both Japanese men and women.",
author = "{EPOCH-JAPAN GROUP} and Wen Zhang and Hiroyasu Iso and Yoshitaka Murakami and Katsuyuki Miura and Masato Nagai and Daisuke Sugiyama and Hirotsugu Ueshima and Tomonori Okamura and Hirotsugu Ueshima and Yutaka Imai and Takayoshi Ohkubo and Fujiko Irie and Akihiko Kitamura and Yutaka Kiyohara and Hideaki Nakagawa and Takeo Nakayama and Akira Okayama and Toshimi Sairenchi and Shigeyuki Saitoh and Kiyomi Sakata and Akiko Tamakoshi and Ichiro Tsuji and Michiko Yamada and Masahiko Kiyama and Yoshihiro Miyamoto and Shizukiyo Ishikawa and Hiroshi Yatsuya",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
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doi = "10.5551/jat.31591",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "692--703",
journal = "Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis",
issn = "1340-3478",
publisher = "Japan Atherosclerosis Society",
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}

Serum uric acid and mortality form cardiovascular disease : EPOCH-JAPAN study. / EPOCH-JAPAN GROUP.

In: Journal of atherosclerosis and thrombosis, Vol. 23, No. 6, 01.01.2016, p. 692-703.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Serum uric acid and mortality form cardiovascular disease

T2 - EPOCH-JAPAN study

AU - EPOCH-JAPAN GROUP

AU - Zhang, Wen

AU - Iso, Hiroyasu

AU - Murakami, Yoshitaka

AU - Miura, Katsuyuki

AU - Nagai, Masato

AU - Sugiyama, Daisuke

AU - Ueshima, Hirotsugu

AU - Okamura, Tomonori

AU - Ueshima, Hirotsugu

AU - Imai, Yutaka

AU - Ohkubo, Takayoshi

AU - Irie, Fujiko

AU - Kitamura, Akihiko

AU - Kiyohara, Yutaka

AU - Nakagawa, Hideaki

AU - Nakayama, Takeo

AU - Okayama, Akira

AU - Sairenchi, Toshimi

AU - Saitoh, Shigeyuki

AU - Sakata, Kiyomi

AU - Tamakoshi, Akiko

AU - Tsuji, Ichiro

AU - Yamada, Michiko

AU - Kiyama, Masahiko

AU - Miyamoto, Yoshihiro

AU - Ishikawa, Shizukiyo

AU - Yatsuya, Hiroshi

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Aim: To investigate the relationship between serum uric acid levels and cardiovascular disease in Asians. Methods: We examined the above relationship using the data of Evidence for Cardiovascular Prevention from Observational Cohorts in Japan (EPOCH-JAPAN Study). The data of 36,313 subjects (15,628 men and 20,685 women aged 35 –89 years without histories of stroke, coronary heart disease, or cancer at baseline) were used for the analyses. Sex-specific hazard ratios (HRs) of mortality from cardiovascular disease were estimated according to the quintiles of serum uric acid using Cox hazard models stratified by cohorts. Results: During 441,771 person-years of follow-up, we documented 1,288 cardiovascular deaths. A J-or U-shaped relationship between serum uric acid level and cardiovascular disease mortality was observed. Compared with the lowest quintile of serum uric acid levels, the highest quintile was associated with an increased cardiovascular disease mortality in men [HR: 1.28; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01– 1.63] and women (HR: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.14–1.99). However, there was no significant association with mortality from stroke, coronary heart disease or heart failure in both men and women. Conclusion: This large pooled analysis in Japan suggested a J-or U-shaped relationship between serum uric acid levels and cardiovascular mortality. The highest quintile of serum uric acid levels was associated with increased cardiovascular disease mortality in both Japanese men and women.

AB - Aim: To investigate the relationship between serum uric acid levels and cardiovascular disease in Asians. Methods: We examined the above relationship using the data of Evidence for Cardiovascular Prevention from Observational Cohorts in Japan (EPOCH-JAPAN Study). The data of 36,313 subjects (15,628 men and 20,685 women aged 35 –89 years without histories of stroke, coronary heart disease, or cancer at baseline) were used for the analyses. Sex-specific hazard ratios (HRs) of mortality from cardiovascular disease were estimated according to the quintiles of serum uric acid using Cox hazard models stratified by cohorts. Results: During 441,771 person-years of follow-up, we documented 1,288 cardiovascular deaths. A J-or U-shaped relationship between serum uric acid level and cardiovascular disease mortality was observed. Compared with the lowest quintile of serum uric acid levels, the highest quintile was associated with an increased cardiovascular disease mortality in men [HR: 1.28; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01– 1.63] and women (HR: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.14–1.99). However, there was no significant association with mortality from stroke, coronary heart disease or heart failure in both men and women. Conclusion: This large pooled analysis in Japan suggested a J-or U-shaped relationship between serum uric acid levels and cardiovascular mortality. The highest quintile of serum uric acid levels was associated with increased cardiovascular disease mortality in both Japanese men and women.

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