Shift of motor activation areas during recovery from hemiparesis after cerebral infarction: A longitudinal study with near-infrared spectroscopy

Kotaro Takeda, Yukihiro Gomi, Itsuki Imai, Nobuaki Shimoda, Masao Hiwatari, Hiroyuki Kato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Motor functional recovery after stroke may be attributable to cerebral reorganization. We used near-infrared spectroscopy, which measures non-invasively the changes in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations in response to neural activation, for monitoring cerebral activation in stroke patients, and investigated the longitudinal changes in functional laterality of activations in the primary sensorimotor cortex during unilateral audio-paced (1 Hz) hand movement. We examined five ischemic stroke patients (4 females and 1 male, 52-67 years old) with mild to moderate hemiparesis at acute stages and chronic stages at least 1 month later. Normal subjects (3 females and 2 males, 47-63 years old) were also included. Unilateral hand movement activated predominantly the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex in the normal subjects and the stroke patients when they moved unaffected hand. Affected hand movements activated bilateral sensorimotor cortices early after stroke (<25 days of stroke onset), whereas the activation pattern returned toward normal at later periods (>35 days). The contralaterality index (0.34 ± 0.12 in normal control) was reduced at early periods (0.00 ± 0.03, p < 0.01) after stroke, and returned to normal (0.35 ± 0.24) as motor function recovered. These findings suggest that a transient increase in motor activation in the ipsilateral intact hemisphere within 1 month may play an important role in the recovery from motor dysfunction after stroke.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)136-144
Number of pages9
JournalNeuroscience Research
Volume59
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-10-2007
Externally publishedYes

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Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
Cerebral Infarction
Motor Cortex
Paresis
Longitudinal Studies
Stroke
Hand
Hemoglobins
Functional Laterality
Sensorimotor Cortex

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Takeda, Kotaro ; Gomi, Yukihiro ; Imai, Itsuki ; Shimoda, Nobuaki ; Hiwatari, Masao ; Kato, Hiroyuki. / Shift of motor activation areas during recovery from hemiparesis after cerebral infarction : A longitudinal study with near-infrared spectroscopy. In: Neuroscience Research. 2007 ; Vol. 59, No. 2. pp. 136-144.
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Shift of motor activation areas during recovery from hemiparesis after cerebral infarction : A longitudinal study with near-infrared spectroscopy. / Takeda, Kotaro; Gomi, Yukihiro; Imai, Itsuki; Shimoda, Nobuaki; Hiwatari, Masao; Kato, Hiroyuki.

In: Neuroscience Research, Vol. 59, No. 2, 01.10.2007, p. 136-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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