Simulation training is useful for shortening the decision-to-delivery interval in cases of emergent cesarean section

Yukako Iitani, Hiroyuki Tsuda, Yumiko Ito, Yoshinori Moriyama, Tomoko Nakano, Kenji Imai, Tomomi Kotani, Fumitaka Kikkawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We examined the effect of simulation training for medical staff on the decision-to-delivery interval (DDI) in cases of emergent cesarean delivery and the effect of a shortened DDI on maternal and neonatal outcomes. Material and methods: Our hospital is a tertiary perinatal center. As the simulation training was performed in March 2014, the study population was divided into two groups: pretraining group (November 2011–March 2014, 29 months: n = 15) and post-training group (April 2014–August 2016, 29 months: n = 35). Results: The DDI was significantly shorter in the post-training group than in the pretraining group (p =.009). In particular, the decision-to-entering the operating room interval was significantly shorter in the post-training group than in the pretraining group (p =.003). The umbilical artery pH was significantly better in post-training group than in the pretraining group (p =.019). Furthermore, the umbilical artery pH was significantly improved by simulation training only in “irreversible” cases (p =.012). Conclusions: The DDI was significantly shortened by introducing simulation training. We also demonstrated a beneficial effect of the simulation training on the umbilical artery pH, especially in “irreversible” cases, without increasing the rate of maternal adverse outcome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3128-3132
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
Volume31
Issue number23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 02-12-2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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