Simultaneous measurement of serum chemokines in autoimmune thyroid diseases: Possible role of IP-10 in the inflammatory response

Izumi Hiratsuka, Mitsuyasu Itoh, Hiroya Yamada, Keiko Yamamoto, Eisuke Tomatsu, Masaki Makino, Shuji Hashimoto, Atsushi Suzuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs), including Graves’ diseases (GD) and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT), are the most common autoimmune diseases, and are mainly mediated by T cells that produce cytokines and chemokines in abnormal amounts. Few reports have described the circulating chemokines active in AITDs. Recently, we used a new multiplex immunobead assay to simultaneously measure cytokines and chemokines in small volume serum samples from patients with AITDs. We measured 23 selected serum chemokines in patients with GD (n=45) or HT (n=26), and healthy controls (n=9). GD patients were further classified as either untreated, intractable, or in remission, while HT patients were classified as either hypothyroid or euthyroid. Of the 23 serum chemokines assayed, only the serum level of IP-10 (CXCL10/ interferon-y-inducible protein 10) was elevated, depending on disease activity, in GD or HT compared with healthy controls. However, the serum level of IP-10 was also increased in both untreated GD patients and hypothyroid HT patients, suggesting that levels of this cytokine may not be affected by disease specificity. In conclusion, autoimmune inflammation in patients with AITD is closely related to the level of the serum chemokine, IP-10. Therefore, IP-10 might be a good biomarker for tissue inflammation in the thyroid, but not a useful biomarker for predicting disease specific activity, the progression of AITDs, or responsiveness to treatment because of its independence from thyroid function or disease specificity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1059-1066
Number of pages8
JournalEndocrine Journal
Volume62
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27-12-2015

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Chemokine CXCL10
Thyroid Diseases
Chemokines
Autoimmune Diseases
Hashimoto Disease
Graves Disease
Serum
Cytokines
Thyroid Gland
Biomarkers
Inflammation
T-Lymphocytes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

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title = "Simultaneous measurement of serum chemokines in autoimmune thyroid diseases: Possible role of IP-10 in the inflammatory response",
abstract = "Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs), including Graves’ diseases (GD) and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT), are the most common autoimmune diseases, and are mainly mediated by T cells that produce cytokines and chemokines in abnormal amounts. Few reports have described the circulating chemokines active in AITDs. Recently, we used a new multiplex immunobead assay to simultaneously measure cytokines and chemokines in small volume serum samples from patients with AITDs. We measured 23 selected serum chemokines in patients with GD (n=45) or HT (n=26), and healthy controls (n=9). GD patients were further classified as either untreated, intractable, or in remission, while HT patients were classified as either hypothyroid or euthyroid. Of the 23 serum chemokines assayed, only the serum level of IP-10 (CXCL10/ interferon-y-inducible protein 10) was elevated, depending on disease activity, in GD or HT compared with healthy controls. However, the serum level of IP-10 was also increased in both untreated GD patients and hypothyroid HT patients, suggesting that levels of this cytokine may not be affected by disease specificity. In conclusion, autoimmune inflammation in patients with AITD is closely related to the level of the serum chemokine, IP-10. Therefore, IP-10 might be a good biomarker for tissue inflammation in the thyroid, but not a useful biomarker for predicting disease specific activity, the progression of AITDs, or responsiveness to treatment because of its independence from thyroid function or disease specificity.",
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Simultaneous measurement of serum chemokines in autoimmune thyroid diseases : Possible role of IP-10 in the inflammatory response. / Hiratsuka, Izumi; Itoh, Mitsuyasu; Yamada, Hiroya; Yamamoto, Keiko; Tomatsu, Eisuke; Makino, Masaki; Hashimoto, Shuji; Suzuki, Atsushi.

In: Endocrine Journal, Vol. 62, No. 12, 27.12.2015, p. 1059-1066.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Simultaneous measurement of serum chemokines in autoimmune thyroid diseases

T2 - Possible role of IP-10 in the inflammatory response

AU - Hiratsuka, Izumi

AU - Itoh, Mitsuyasu

AU - Yamada, Hiroya

AU - Yamamoto, Keiko

AU - Tomatsu, Eisuke

AU - Makino, Masaki

AU - Hashimoto, Shuji

AU - Suzuki, Atsushi

PY - 2015/12/27

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