Sleep duration and risk of breast cancer

The JACC Study

JACC Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The evidence on beneficial or adverse effects of sleep duration on risk of breast cancer remains controversial and limited, especially in Asia. Methods: A prospective study of 34,350 women aged 40–79 years in whom sleep duration, and menstrual and reproductive histories were determined by a self-administered questionnaire. The follow-up period was from 1988 to 2009, and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of breast cancer incidence were calculated for shorter sleep duration in reference to sleep duration of ≥ 8 h/day by Cox proportional hazard models. Results: During 19.2-year median follow-up (236 cases), we found a significant inverse association between sleep duration and risk of breast cancer, especially among postmenopausal women and women with low parity (nulliparous and women with < 3 children); the multivariable HRs (95% CIs) among postmenopausal women who reported 7 h/day and ≤ 6 h/day of sleep in reference to ≥ 8 h/day were 1.49 (0.81–2.76) and 1.98 (1.08–3.70) (P for trend = 0.028), respectively, and the corresponding values among women with low parity were 1.50 (0.96–2.35) and 1.76 (1.01–2.79) (P for trend = 0.018). Conclusions: Short sleep duration was associated with increased risk of incident breast cancer, especially among postmenopausal women and women with low parity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)219-225
Number of pages7
JournalBreast Cancer Research and Treatment
Volume174
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28-02-2019

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Sleep
Breast Neoplasms
Parity
Confidence Intervals
Reproductive History
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

JACC Study Group. / Sleep duration and risk of breast cancer : The JACC Study. In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. 2019 ; Vol. 174, No. 1. pp. 219-225.
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abstract = "Purpose: The evidence on beneficial or adverse effects of sleep duration on risk of breast cancer remains controversial and limited, especially in Asia. Methods: A prospective study of 34,350 women aged 40–79 years in whom sleep duration, and menstrual and reproductive histories were determined by a self-administered questionnaire. The follow-up period was from 1988 to 2009, and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs) of breast cancer incidence were calculated for shorter sleep duration in reference to sleep duration of ≥ 8 h/day by Cox proportional hazard models. Results: During 19.2-year median follow-up (236 cases), we found a significant inverse association between sleep duration and risk of breast cancer, especially among postmenopausal women and women with low parity (nulliparous and women with < 3 children); the multivariable HRs (95{\%} CIs) among postmenopausal women who reported 7 h/day and ≤ 6 h/day of sleep in reference to ≥ 8 h/day were 1.49 (0.81–2.76) and 1.98 (1.08–3.70) (P for trend = 0.028), respectively, and the corresponding values among women with low parity were 1.50 (0.96–2.35) and 1.76 (1.01–2.79) (P for trend = 0.018). Conclusions: Short sleep duration was associated with increased risk of incident breast cancer, especially among postmenopausal women and women with low parity.",
author = "{JACC Study Group} and Jinhong Cao and Eshak, {Ehab S.} and Keyang Liu and Isao Muraki and Renzhe Cui and Hiroyasu Iso and Akiko Tamakoshi and Mitsuru Mori and Yoshihiro Kaneko and Ichiro Tsuji and Yosikazu Nakamura and Hiroyasu Iso and Kazumasa Yamagishi and Haruo Mikami and Michiko Kurosawa and Yoshiharu Hoshiyama and Naohito Tanabe and Koji Tamakoshi and Kenji Wakai and Shinkan Tokudome and Koji Suzuki and Shuji Hashimoto and Hiroshi Yatsuya and Shogo Kikuchi and Koji Suzuki and Shuji Hashimoto and Hiroshi Yatsuya and Kotaro Ozasa and Kazuya Mikami and Chigusa Date and Kiyomi Sakata and Yoichi Kurozawa and Takesumi Yoshimura and Yoshihisa Fujino and Akira Shibata and Naoyuki Okamoto and Hideo Shio",
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Sleep duration and risk of breast cancer : The JACC Study. / JACC Study Group.

In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, Vol. 174, No. 1, 28.02.2019, p. 219-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Sleep duration and risk of breast cancer

T2 - The JACC Study

AU - JACC Study Group

AU - Cao, Jinhong

AU - Eshak, Ehab S.

AU - Liu, Keyang

AU - Muraki, Isao

AU - Cui, Renzhe

AU - Iso, Hiroyasu

AU - Tamakoshi, Akiko

AU - Mori, Mitsuru

AU - Kaneko, Yoshihiro

AU - Tsuji, Ichiro

AU - Nakamura, Yosikazu

AU - Iso, Hiroyasu

AU - Yamagishi, Kazumasa

AU - Mikami, Haruo

AU - Kurosawa, Michiko

AU - Hoshiyama, Yoshiharu

AU - Tanabe, Naohito

AU - Tamakoshi, Koji

AU - Wakai, Kenji

AU - Tokudome, Shinkan

AU - Suzuki, Koji

AU - Hashimoto, Shuji

AU - Yatsuya, Hiroshi

AU - Kikuchi, Shogo

AU - Suzuki, Koji

AU - Hashimoto, Shuji

AU - Yatsuya, Hiroshi

AU - Ozasa, Kotaro

AU - Mikami, Kazuya

AU - Date, Chigusa

AU - Sakata, Kiyomi

AU - Kurozawa, Yoichi

AU - Yoshimura, Takesumi

AU - Fujino, Yoshihisa

AU - Shibata, Akira

AU - Okamoto, Naoyuki

AU - Shio, Hideo

PY - 2019/2/28

Y1 - 2019/2/28

N2 - Purpose: The evidence on beneficial or adverse effects of sleep duration on risk of breast cancer remains controversial and limited, especially in Asia. Methods: A prospective study of 34,350 women aged 40–79 years in whom sleep duration, and menstrual and reproductive histories were determined by a self-administered questionnaire. The follow-up period was from 1988 to 2009, and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of breast cancer incidence were calculated for shorter sleep duration in reference to sleep duration of ≥ 8 h/day by Cox proportional hazard models. Results: During 19.2-year median follow-up (236 cases), we found a significant inverse association between sleep duration and risk of breast cancer, especially among postmenopausal women and women with low parity (nulliparous and women with < 3 children); the multivariable HRs (95% CIs) among postmenopausal women who reported 7 h/day and ≤ 6 h/day of sleep in reference to ≥ 8 h/day were 1.49 (0.81–2.76) and 1.98 (1.08–3.70) (P for trend = 0.028), respectively, and the corresponding values among women with low parity were 1.50 (0.96–2.35) and 1.76 (1.01–2.79) (P for trend = 0.018). Conclusions: Short sleep duration was associated with increased risk of incident breast cancer, especially among postmenopausal women and women with low parity.

AB - Purpose: The evidence on beneficial or adverse effects of sleep duration on risk of breast cancer remains controversial and limited, especially in Asia. Methods: A prospective study of 34,350 women aged 40–79 years in whom sleep duration, and menstrual and reproductive histories were determined by a self-administered questionnaire. The follow-up period was from 1988 to 2009, and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of breast cancer incidence were calculated for shorter sleep duration in reference to sleep duration of ≥ 8 h/day by Cox proportional hazard models. Results: During 19.2-year median follow-up (236 cases), we found a significant inverse association between sleep duration and risk of breast cancer, especially among postmenopausal women and women with low parity (nulliparous and women with < 3 children); the multivariable HRs (95% CIs) among postmenopausal women who reported 7 h/day and ≤ 6 h/day of sleep in reference to ≥ 8 h/day were 1.49 (0.81–2.76) and 1.98 (1.08–3.70) (P for trend = 0.028), respectively, and the corresponding values among women with low parity were 1.50 (0.96–2.35) and 1.76 (1.01–2.79) (P for trend = 0.018). Conclusions: Short sleep duration was associated with increased risk of incident breast cancer, especially among postmenopausal women and women with low parity.

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