Smoking cessation rapidly increases circulating progenitor cells in peripheral blood in chronic smokers

Takahisa Kondo, Mutsuharu Hayashi, Kyosuke Takeshita, Yasushi Numaguchi, Koichi Kobayashi, Shigeo Iino, Yasuya Inden, Toyoaki Murohara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

363 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to postnatal angiogenesis. The number of circulating EPCs has an inverse correlation with coronary risk scores. However, the effect of smoking on the number of circulating EPCs is not well-known. Methods and Results - We examined the effects of chronic smoking and of smoking cessation on EPC levels. Circulating EPCs were quantified by flow cytometry as CD45 lowCD34+CD133+ (progenitor cells [PCs]) or CD45lowCD34+CD133+VEGFR2+ (EPCs) in 14 nonsmokers and in 15 smokers. All smokers quit smoking. Eight quit smoking with nicotine patch and 7 without nicotine patch. PC/EPC levels were inversely correlated with the number of cigarettes smoked. Circulating PCs/EPCs increased rapidly after cessation (P<0.0001) and decreased again after resumption of smoking to the level similar to that before cessation (P=0.0031). The magnitude of increase in EPCs was greater in light smokers than in heavy smokers. Conclusions - The number of circulating PCs/EPCs was reduced in chronic smokers. Smoking cessation led to a rapid restoration of PC/EPC levels. The recovery of EPC levels was greater in light smokers than in heavy smokers. The decreased number of circulating EPCs would make smokers susceptible to cardiovascular disease, and even short-time cessation of smoking may be an effective means to reduce cardiovascular risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1442-1447
Number of pages6
JournalArteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology
Volume24
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 08-2004

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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