Sociodemographic and work-related factors influencing long working hours among cardiovascular surgeons in Japan: a cross-sectional study

Ikuko Shibasaki, Akihiko Usui, Shigeki Morita, Noboru Motomura, Yasuo Haruyama, Hitoshi Yokoyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The maximum limit on overtime working hours for physicians will be applied from 2024. To explore sociodemographic and work-related factors influencing overtime work among cardiovascular surgeons (CS) in Japan. This cross-sectional study included 607 CS who responded to an online survey. Working hours were categorized into ≤60 hours, 60–79 hours, and ≥80 hours per week according to Japan Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) were calculated using a multinomial analysis with stepwise reduction after adjustment for potential confounders. Compared to ≤60 hours, significant factors related to 60–79 hours and ≥80 hours per week were age groups of 30s to 50s versus 60s (aOR: 7.48–3.22 and 23.64–4.87), management with cardiovascular drugs (aOR: 1.87 and 5.80), and postoperative wound management (aOR: 0.47 and 0.16), respectively. Significantly related informed consent for surgery (aOR: 3.29) was seen in 60–79 hours. Contrarily, CS who worked for ≥80 hours took on-duty 5 times or more per month (aOR: 3.89), performed night or holiday calls 20 times or more per month (aOR: 2.26), and attend-ed the intensive care unit (aOR: 3.12). These findings suggest that younger, and some non-surgical work-related factors could influence long working hours among CS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)16-28
Number of pages13
JournalIndustrial Health
Volume60
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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