Strategy for the treatment of unresectable hepatoblastoma: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by delayed primary operation or liver transplantation

Hisashi Urata, Hiroki Hori, Keiichi Uchida, Mikihiro Inoue, Yoshihiro Komada, Masato Kusunoki

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present our experience in using neoadjuvant regional and systemic chemotherapy together with surgical resection as a strategy for the treatment of unresectable hepatoblastoma. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was given prior to surgical treatment in six children with unresectable hepatoblastoma. Furthermore, the neoadjuvant chemotherapy was intensified according to response to the initial treatment. Surgical resection was performed when the tumor was judged to be resectable. The adjuvant chemotherapy was given after delayed primary operation. Five of six children receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy responded to the treatment and subsequently received delayed primary operation or living donor liver transplantation. All five children who had successful surgery have completed treatment and show no evidence of disease to date (27-115 months after surgery). It is concluded that neoadjuvant chemotherapy given as a combination of regional and systemic chemotherapy was effective for tumor reduction in cases with early stage or stage III disease. Also, to increase the cure rate of children with localized disease that was still unresectable after chemotherapy, living donor liver transplantation, which offers some advantage in timing of transplant compared with cadaveric liver transplantation, seems to be a possible procedure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-99
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Surgery
Volume89
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 04-2004
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

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