Surgical technique and outcome of extensive frontal lobectomy for treatment of intracable non-lesional frontal lobe epilepsy

Sachiko Hirata, Michiharu Morino, Shunsuke Nakae, Takahiro Matsumoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Although extensive frontal lobectomy (eFL) is a common surgical procedure for intractable frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), there have been very few reports regarding surgical techniques for eFL. This article provides step-by-step descriptions of our surgical technique for non-lesional FLE. Sixteen patients undergoing eFL were included in this study. The goals were to maximize gray matter removal, including the orbital gyrus and subcallosal area, and to spare the primary motor and premotor cortexes and anterior perforated substance. The eFL consists of three steps: (1) positioning, craniotomy, and exposure; (2) lateral frontal lobe resection; and (3), resection of the rectus gyrus and orbital gyrus. Resection ahead of bregma allows preservation of motor and premotor area function. To remove the orbital gyrus preserving anterior perforated substance, it is essential to visualize the olfactory trigone beneath the pia. It is important to observe the surface of the contralateral medial frontal lobe for complete removal of the subcallosal area of the frontal lobe. Thirteen patients (81.25%) became seizure-free and three patients (18.75%) continued to have seizures. None of the patients showed any complications. The eFL is a good surgical technique for the treatment of intractable non-lesional FLE. For treatment of epilepsy by eFL, it is important to resect the non-eloquent area of the frontal lobe as much as possible with preservation of the eloquent cortex.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-25
Number of pages9
Journalneurologia medico-chirurgica
Volume60
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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