Surgical treatment of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms

S. F. Chen, Y. Kato, R. Sinha, A. Kumar, T. Watabe, S. Imizu, J. Oda, D. Oguri, H. Sano, Yuichi Hirose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present our experience with elective microsurgical clipping of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA) and analyze this management. A total of 150 patients with UIA were reviewed and data were collected with regard to age, sex, presence of symptoms, location and size of the aneurysms, surgical complications and postoperative 1 year outcomes. Aneurysm size was assessed either by three-dimensional CT angiography or digital subtraction angiogram. Glasgow Outcome Scale was used to assess clinical outcomes. One hundred and fifty patients with 165 aneurysms were treated in this series. The mean size of the UIA was 5.6 mm. Eighty aneurysms (48.5%) were less than 5 mm in size, and 73 (44.2%) were from 5 to 10 mm. Ten (6.1%) of the aneurysms were large and two (1.2%) were giant. One hundred and forty-three were asymptomatic and seven were symptomatic before surgery. The outcome was good in 147 patients (98%), and only three patients (2%) had a treatment-related unfavorable outcome. Five patients experienced transient neurological deficits and one patient experienced permanent neurological deficits. Overall 98.7% of the treated aneurysms were satisfactorily obliterated. Wound complications were seen only in three patients. In conclusion, UIA pose a significant challenge for neurosurgeons, where a delicate balance between benefits and possible risks must be weighed. If the requisite expertise is available, they can be treated surgically with low morbidity and a good outcome at specialized neurovascular centers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-72
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Neuroscience
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2015

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Intracranial Aneurysm
Aneurysm
Therapeutics
Glasgow Outcome Scale
Angiography
Morbidity
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Chen, S. F. ; Kato, Y. ; Sinha, R. ; Kumar, A. ; Watabe, T. ; Imizu, S. ; Oda, J. ; Oguri, D. ; Sano, H. ; Hirose, Yuichi. / Surgical treatment of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms. In: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience. 2015 ; Vol. 22, No. 1. pp. 69-72.
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Chen, SF, Kato, Y, Sinha, R, Kumar, A, Watabe, T, Imizu, S, Oda, J, Oguri, D, Sano, H & Hirose, Y 2015, 'Surgical treatment of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms', Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 69-72. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jocn.2014.05.048

Surgical treatment of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms. / Chen, S. F.; Kato, Y.; Sinha, R.; Kumar, A.; Watabe, T.; Imizu, S.; Oda, J.; Oguri, D.; Sano, H.; Hirose, Yuichi.

In: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, Vol. 22, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 69-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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