Temporal facilitation prior to voluntary muscle relaxation

Kenichi Sugawara, Shigeo Tanabe, Toshio Higashi, Takamasa Tsurumi, Tatsuya Kasai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the dominancy of excitability changes in motor cortex or spinal levels and temporal tuning mechanisms of muscle relaxation. We delivered transcranial magnetic stimulation and electric (H-reflex) stimulations relative to the application of the response signal under the reaction time task. The results showed that a significant change was found in only motor evoked potential during the prerelaxation phase, 30 ms after the response signal presented for muscle relaxation, but similar changes were not found in H-reflex. We suggested that this phenomenon, may be, reflects on excitation of corticospinal neurons, which consequently play an important role for muscle relaxation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)442-452
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Neuroscience
Volume119
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-03-2009

Fingerprint

Muscle Relaxation
H-Reflex
Skeletal Muscle
Motor Evoked Potentials
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Motor Cortex
Reaction Time
Neurons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Sugawara, Kenichi ; Tanabe, Shigeo ; Higashi, Toshio ; Tsurumi, Takamasa ; Kasai, Tatsuya. / Temporal facilitation prior to voluntary muscle relaxation. In: International Journal of Neuroscience. 2009 ; Vol. 119, No. 3. pp. 442-452.
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Temporal facilitation prior to voluntary muscle relaxation. / Sugawara, Kenichi; Tanabe, Shigeo; Higashi, Toshio; Tsurumi, Takamasa; Kasai, Tatsuya.

In: International Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 119, No. 3, 01.03.2009, p. 442-452.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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