The association between self-reported history of physical diseases and psychological distress in a community-dwelling Japanese population: The Ohsaki Cohort 2006 Study

Naoki Nakaya, Mana Kogure, Kumi Saito-Nakaya, Yasutake Tomata, Toshimasa Sone, Masako Kakizaki, Ichiro Tsuji

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21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Patients with physical disease are known to suffer considerable psychological distress. Social support may confound the association between physical disease and psychological distress. Population-based epidemiological studies have not been conducted on the association between history of physical disease, psychological distress and social support. Methods: Using cross-sectional data from 2006, we studied 43 487 community-dwelling people aged â 40 years living in Japan. We examined the association between 13 self-reported histories of physical disease and psychological distress evaluated using the Kessler 6-item psychological distress scale (K6), defined as â 13 points out of 24. To investigate the association, we performed multiple logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, gender, social support and possible confounders. Social support, as the interaction between physical disease and psychological depression, was tested through the addition of cross-product terms to the multivariate-adjusted model. Results: The following histories of physical disease were found significantly and positively associated with psychological distress: cancer, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke, gastric or duodenal ulcer, liver disease, arthritis, osteoporosis, kidney disease and fall or fracture (odds ratio, 1.2-2.3). Social support did not modify the association between most histories of physical disease and psychological distress. Conclusions: Subjects with a history of physical disease were significantly and positively associated with psychological distress, and social support did not modify this association for most physical diseases. Even after patients have left hospital following treatment for physical disease, they require continuous monitoring for psychological distress by doctors and paramedics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)45-49
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Public Health
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-02-2013

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Independent Living
Cohort Studies
Psychology
Social Support
Population
Allied Health Personnel
Kidney Diseases
Stomach Ulcer
Duodenal Ulcer
Hyperlipidemias
Osteoporosis
Arthritis
Liver Diseases
Epidemiologic Studies
Diabetes Mellitus
Japan
Logistic Models
Stroke
Odds Ratio
Myocardial Infarction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Nakaya, Naoki ; Kogure, Mana ; Saito-Nakaya, Kumi ; Tomata, Yasutake ; Sone, Toshimasa ; Kakizaki, Masako ; Tsuji, Ichiro. / The association between self-reported history of physical diseases and psychological distress in a community-dwelling Japanese population : The Ohsaki Cohort 2006 Study. In: European Journal of Public Health. 2013 ; Vol. 24, No. 1. pp. 45-49.
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The association between self-reported history of physical diseases and psychological distress in a community-dwelling Japanese population : The Ohsaki Cohort 2006 Study. / Nakaya, Naoki; Kogure, Mana; Saito-Nakaya, Kumi; Tomata, Yasutake; Sone, Toshimasa; Kakizaki, Masako; Tsuji, Ichiro.

In: European Journal of Public Health, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.02.2013, p. 45-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - The association between self-reported history of physical diseases and psychological distress in a community-dwelling Japanese population

T2 - The Ohsaki Cohort 2006 Study

AU - Nakaya, Naoki

AU - Kogure, Mana

AU - Saito-Nakaya, Kumi

AU - Tomata, Yasutake

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AU - Kakizaki, Masako

AU - Tsuji, Ichiro

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N2 - Background: Patients with physical disease are known to suffer considerable psychological distress. Social support may confound the association between physical disease and psychological distress. Population-based epidemiological studies have not been conducted on the association between history of physical disease, psychological distress and social support. Methods: Using cross-sectional data from 2006, we studied 43 487 community-dwelling people aged â 40 years living in Japan. We examined the association between 13 self-reported histories of physical disease and psychological distress evaluated using the Kessler 6-item psychological distress scale (K6), defined as â 13 points out of 24. To investigate the association, we performed multiple logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, gender, social support and possible confounders. Social support, as the interaction between physical disease and psychological depression, was tested through the addition of cross-product terms to the multivariate-adjusted model. Results: The following histories of physical disease were found significantly and positively associated with psychological distress: cancer, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke, gastric or duodenal ulcer, liver disease, arthritis, osteoporosis, kidney disease and fall or fracture (odds ratio, 1.2-2.3). Social support did not modify the association between most histories of physical disease and psychological distress. Conclusions: Subjects with a history of physical disease were significantly and positively associated with psychological distress, and social support did not modify this association for most physical diseases. Even after patients have left hospital following treatment for physical disease, they require continuous monitoring for psychological distress by doctors and paramedics.

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