The association between weight fluctuation and all-cause mortality: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Yan Zhang, Fangfang Hou, Jiexue Li, Haiying Yu, Lu Li, Shilian Hu, Guodong Shen, Hiroshi Yatsuya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Many observational studies have reported an association between weight fluctuation and all-cause mortality. However, the conclusions obtained from these studies have been unclear. OBJECTIVE: The current meta-analysis aimed to clarify the association between weight fluctuation and all-cause mortality. DATA SOURCE: We electronically searched PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science for articles reporting an association between weight fluctuation and all-cause mortality that were published before April 30, 2018. STUDY APPRAISAL AND SYNTHESIS METHODS: The methodological quality of each study was appraised using the modified Newcastle Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. The hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were extracted from the included studies and pooled using random-effect models. Meta-regression approaches were also performed to explore sources of between-study heterogeneity. RESULTS: A total of 15 studies were eligible for the current meta-analysis. The pooled overall HR for all-cause mortality in the group with the greatest weight fluctuations compared with the most stable weight category was 1.45 (95% CI: 1.29-1.63). Considerable between-study heterogeneity was observed, some of which was partially explained by the different follow-up durations used by the included studies. Moreover, publication bias that inflated the risk of all-cause mortality was detected using Egger's test (P = .001). CONCLUSION: Weight fluctuation might be associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e17513
JournalMedicine
Volume98
Issue number42
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-10-2019

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Meta-Analysis
Weights and Measures
Mortality
Confidence Intervals
Publication Bias
PubMed
Observational Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Zhang, Yan ; Hou, Fangfang ; Li, Jiexue ; Yu, Haiying ; Li, Lu ; Hu, Shilian ; Shen, Guodong ; Yatsuya, Hiroshi. / The association between weight fluctuation and all-cause mortality : A systematic review and meta-analysis. In: Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 98, No. 42. pp. e17513.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Many observational studies have reported an association between weight fluctuation and all-cause mortality. However, the conclusions obtained from these studies have been unclear. OBJECTIVE: The current meta-analysis aimed to clarify the association between weight fluctuation and all-cause mortality. DATA SOURCE: We electronically searched PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science for articles reporting an association between weight fluctuation and all-cause mortality that were published before April 30, 2018. STUDY APPRAISAL AND SYNTHESIS METHODS: The methodological quality of each study was appraised using the modified Newcastle Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. The hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs) were extracted from the included studies and pooled using random-effect models. Meta-regression approaches were also performed to explore sources of between-study heterogeneity. RESULTS: A total of 15 studies were eligible for the current meta-analysis. The pooled overall HR for all-cause mortality in the group with the greatest weight fluctuations compared with the most stable weight category was 1.45 (95{\%} CI: 1.29-1.63). Considerable between-study heterogeneity was observed, some of which was partially explained by the different follow-up durations used by the included studies. Moreover, publication bias that inflated the risk of all-cause mortality was detected using Egger's test (P = .001). CONCLUSION: Weight fluctuation might be associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality.",
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The association between weight fluctuation and all-cause mortality : A systematic review and meta-analysis. / Zhang, Yan; Hou, Fangfang; Li, Jiexue; Yu, Haiying; Li, Lu; Hu, Shilian; Shen, Guodong; Yatsuya, Hiroshi.

In: Medicine, Vol. 98, No. 42, 01.10.2019, p. e17513.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - The association between weight fluctuation and all-cause mortality

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AU - Zhang, Yan

AU - Hou, Fangfang

AU - Li, Jiexue

AU - Yu, Haiying

AU - Li, Lu

AU - Hu, Shilian

AU - Shen, Guodong

AU - Yatsuya, Hiroshi

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