The ecology of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) in the developed world

Yohei Doi, Alina Iovleva, Robert A. Bonomo

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Since the initial appearance in the 1980s, Enterobacteriaceae producing extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) have increased in prevalence and emerged as a major antimicrobial-resistant pathogen. The source of these antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in the developed world is an area of active investigation.

Methods: A standard internet search was conducted with a focus on the epidemiology and potential sources of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in the developed world.

Results: The last decade has witnessed several major changes in the epidemiology of these bacteria: replacement of TEM and SHV-type ESBLs by CTX-M-family ESBLs, emergence of Escherichia coli ST131 as a prevalent vehicle of ESBL, and spread of ESBL-producing E. coli in the community. The most studied potential sources of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in humans in the community include food and companion animals, the environment and person-to-person transmission, though definitive links are yet to be established. Evidence is emerging that international travel may serve as a major source of introduction of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae into the developed world.

Conclusions: ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae has become a major multidrug-resistant pathogen in the last two decades, especially in the community settings. The multifactorial nature of its expansion poses a major challenge in the efforts to control them.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S44-S51
JournalJournal of travel medicine
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-04-2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Enterobacteriaceae
Ecology
Epidemiology
Escherichia coli
Bacteria
Pets
Internet
Food

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Doi, Yohei ; Iovleva, Alina ; Bonomo, Robert A. / The ecology of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) in the developed world. In: Journal of travel medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 24, No. 1. pp. S44-S51.
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abstract = "Background: Since the initial appearance in the 1980s, Enterobacteriaceae producing extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) have increased in prevalence and emerged as a major antimicrobial-resistant pathogen. The source of these antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in the developed world is an area of active investigation.Methods: A standard internet search was conducted with a focus on the epidemiology and potential sources of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in the developed world.Results: The last decade has witnessed several major changes in the epidemiology of these bacteria: replacement of TEM and SHV-type ESBLs by CTX-M-family ESBLs, emergence of Escherichia coli ST131 as a prevalent vehicle of ESBL, and spread of ESBL-producing E. coli in the community. The most studied potential sources of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in humans in the community include food and companion animals, the environment and person-to-person transmission, though definitive links are yet to be established. Evidence is emerging that international travel may serve as a major source of introduction of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae into the developed world.Conclusions: ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae has become a major multidrug-resistant pathogen in the last two decades, especially in the community settings. The multifactorial nature of its expansion poses a major challenge in the efforts to control them.",
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The ecology of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) in the developed world. / Doi, Yohei; Iovleva, Alina; Bonomo, Robert A.

In: Journal of travel medicine, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.04.2017, p. S44-S51.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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