The effects of antihypertensive agents on the survival rate of polycystic kidney disease in Han:SPRD rats

Yoshihiko Kanno, Hirokazu Okada, Kenshi Moriwaki, Shizuko Nagao, Hisahide Takahashi, Hiromichi Suzuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary renal disorder in humans. Hypertension is one of the major complications, and its control might affect the renal survival and disease mortality. Suitable antihypertensive agents have been discussed based on clinical and animal studies, but no definitive conclusion has been reached. Generally, therefore, all antihypertensives are indiscriminately treated as if providing the same level of blood pressure control. In this study, the blood pressure control of two antihypertensives was investigated using a rat model of ADPKD in humans. Twenty-four male Hannover-Sprague Dawley (Han:SPRD) rats were divided into three groups: a group receiving amlodipine (6 mg/day), a group receiving benazepril (6 mg/day) and an untreated control group. Blood pressure, body weight, and urinary protein excretion were regularly measured up to week 52. Amlodipine and benazepril significantly decreased blood pressure and urinary protein excretion to the same degree. Moreover, a remarkably prolonged survival rate was observed in both groups (at week 52, the survival rate was 25% in controls, 50% in the amlodipine group, and 50% in the benazepril group). Examination at autopsy revealed that enlarged cysts were prevalent in the renal tissue of both experimental all three groups, suggesting that the cystic disease had reached the end-stage in all the animals. In conclusion, both amlodipine and benazepril significantly improved blood pressure control, urinary protein excretion, and survival rate, possibly due to their enhancement of renal survival.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)939-943
Number of pages5
JournalHypertension Research
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2002

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Polycystic Kidney Diseases
Amlodipine
Antihypertensive Agents
Sprague Dawley Rats
Survival Rate
Blood Pressure
Kidney
Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney
Proteins
Cysts
Autopsy
Body Weight
Hypertension
Control Groups
Mortality
benazepril

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Kanno, Yoshihiko ; Okada, Hirokazu ; Moriwaki, Kenshi ; Nagao, Shizuko ; Takahashi, Hisahide ; Suzuki, Hiromichi. / The effects of antihypertensive agents on the survival rate of polycystic kidney disease in Han:SPRD rats. In: Hypertension Research. 2002 ; Vol. 25, No. 6. pp. 939-943.
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The effects of antihypertensive agents on the survival rate of polycystic kidney disease in Han:SPRD rats. / Kanno, Yoshihiko; Okada, Hirokazu; Moriwaki, Kenshi; Nagao, Shizuko; Takahashi, Hisahide; Suzuki, Hiromichi.

In: Hypertension Research, Vol. 25, No. 6, 01.01.2002, p. 939-943.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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