The impact of multiple role occupancy on health-related behaviours in Japan

Differences by gender and age

Y. Takeda, I. Kawachi, Z. Yamagata, Shuji Hashimoto, Y. Matsumura, S. Oguri, A. Okayama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: We examined gender and age differences in the impact of multiple role occupancy on health-related behaviours and health status among working age Japanese adults. Methods: We analysed the individually linked, nationally representative data of 5693 respondents aged 20-59, who completed the Comprehensive Survey of the Living Conditions of People on Health and Welfare and the National Nutrition Survey, conducted by the Japanese government in 1995. Results: Younger women benefited from multiple roles (less smoking), while younger men demonstrated more high-risk behaviours (more smoking, heavier drinking). By contrast, middle-aged men benefited from multiple roles (less smoking, fewer health problems), while middle-aged women reported lower health maintenance behaviours (less exercise, fewer health check-ups). Conclusions: Japanese society appears to be undergoing a transition in gender roles, as reflected by age and gender differences in the impact of multiple roles on health and health-related behaviours. Middle-aged males benefit from multiple roles (being the primary bread-winner and being married), while middle-aged women do not. This pattern seems to break down for younger Japanese men and women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)966-975
Number of pages10
JournalPublic Health
Volume120
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-10-2006

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Japan
Health
Smoking
Nutrition Surveys
Social Conditions
Bread
Risk-Taking
Health Status
Drinking
Exercise
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Takeda, Y. ; Kawachi, I. ; Yamagata, Z. ; Hashimoto, Shuji ; Matsumura, Y. ; Oguri, S. ; Okayama, A. / The impact of multiple role occupancy on health-related behaviours in Japan : Differences by gender and age. In: Public Health. 2006 ; Vol. 120, No. 10. pp. 966-975.
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The impact of multiple role occupancy on health-related behaviours in Japan : Differences by gender and age. / Takeda, Y.; Kawachi, I.; Yamagata, Z.; Hashimoto, Shuji; Matsumura, Y.; Oguri, S.; Okayama, A.

In: Public Health, Vol. 120, No. 10, 01.10.2006, p. 966-975.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Oguri, S.

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