The inhibitory effects of thiopental, midazolam, and ketamine on human neutrophil functions

Kahoru Nishina, Hirohiko Akamatsu, Katsuya Mikawa, Makoto Shiga, Nobuhiro Maekawa, Hidefumi Obara, Yukie Niwa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

127 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the effect of thiopental, midazolam, and ketamine (at clinically relevant concentrations and at 0.1 and 10 times these concentrations) on several aspects of human neutrophil functions. The three intravenous (IV) anesthetics significantly decreased chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) (O2-, H2O2, OH) production of neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. At clinically relevant concentrations, thiopental and midazolam significantly depressed these neutrophil functions. However, ketamine at the clinical plasma concentration did not impair chemotaxis or ROS production, except phagocytosis. In contrast, the three anesthetics had no effect on the levels of ROS production by a cell-free ROS generating system. In addition, intracellular calcium concentrations in neutrophils stimulated by N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucil-L- phenylalanine were dose-dependently decreased in the presence of each of the three anesthetics. The suppression of an increase in intracellular calcium concentrations may be responsible for the inhibition of neutrophil functions by the IV anesthetics. Implications: Neutrophils play an important role in the antibacterial host defense system and autotissue injury. We found that thiopental and midazolam (but not ketamine), at clinically relevant concentrations, impaired the neutrophil functions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-165
Number of pages7
JournalAnesthesia and Analgesia
Volume86
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-1998
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The inhibitory effects of thiopental, midazolam, and ketamine on human neutrophil functions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this